Pharmacy student knowledge retention after completing either a simulated or written patient case

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Abstract

Objective. To determine pharmacy students' knowledge retention from and comfort level with a patient-case simulation compared with a written patient case. Design. Pharmacy students were randomly assigned to participate in either a written patient case or a simulated patient case in which a high-fidelity mannequin was used to portray a patient experiencing a narcotic and acetaminophen overdose. Assessment. Participants' responses on a multiple-choice test and a survey instrument administered before the case, immediately after the case, and 25 days later indicated that participation in the simulated patient case did not result in greater knowledge retention or comfort level than participation in the written patient case. Students' knowledge improved post-intervention regardless of which teaching method was used. Conclusions. Although further research is needed to determine whether the use of simulation in the PharmD curriculum is equivalent or superior to other teaching methods, students' enthusiasm for learning in a simulated environment where they can safely apply patient care skills make this technology worth exploring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Pharmaceutical Education
Volume76
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 18 2012

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Pharmacy Students
knowledge
student
simulation
participation
method of teaching
Teaching
teaching method
Patient Simulation
patient care
Students
Manikins
Narcotics
Acetaminophen
drug
curriculum
Curriculum
Patient Care
Learning
learning

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

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title = "Pharmacy student knowledge retention after completing either a simulated or written patient case",
abstract = "Objective. To determine pharmacy students' knowledge retention from and comfort level with a patient-case simulation compared with a written patient case. Design. Pharmacy students were randomly assigned to participate in either a written patient case or a simulated patient case in which a high-fidelity mannequin was used to portray a patient experiencing a narcotic and acetaminophen overdose. Assessment. Participants' responses on a multiple-choice test and a survey instrument administered before the case, immediately after the case, and 25 days later indicated that participation in the simulated patient case did not result in greater knowledge retention or comfort level than participation in the written patient case. Students' knowledge improved post-intervention regardless of which teaching method was used. Conclusions. Although further research is needed to determine whether the use of simulation in the PharmD curriculum is equivalent or superior to other teaching methods, students' enthusiasm for learning in a simulated environment where they can safely apply patient care skills make this technology worth exploring.",
author = "Shaunta' Chamberlin and Wylie, {Douglas R.} and Anthony Rowe and Robert Heidel and Andrea Franks",
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T1 - Pharmacy student knowledge retention after completing either a simulated or written patient case

AU - Chamberlin, Shaunta'

AU - Wylie, Douglas R.

AU - Rowe, Anthony

AU - Heidel, Robert

AU - Franks, Andrea

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N2 - Objective. To determine pharmacy students' knowledge retention from and comfort level with a patient-case simulation compared with a written patient case. Design. Pharmacy students were randomly assigned to participate in either a written patient case or a simulated patient case in which a high-fidelity mannequin was used to portray a patient experiencing a narcotic and acetaminophen overdose. Assessment. Participants' responses on a multiple-choice test and a survey instrument administered before the case, immediately after the case, and 25 days later indicated that participation in the simulated patient case did not result in greater knowledge retention or comfort level than participation in the written patient case. Students' knowledge improved post-intervention regardless of which teaching method was used. Conclusions. Although further research is needed to determine whether the use of simulation in the PharmD curriculum is equivalent or superior to other teaching methods, students' enthusiasm for learning in a simulated environment where they can safely apply patient care skills make this technology worth exploring.

AB - Objective. To determine pharmacy students' knowledge retention from and comfort level with a patient-case simulation compared with a written patient case. Design. Pharmacy students were randomly assigned to participate in either a written patient case or a simulated patient case in which a high-fidelity mannequin was used to portray a patient experiencing a narcotic and acetaminophen overdose. Assessment. Participants' responses on a multiple-choice test and a survey instrument administered before the case, immediately after the case, and 25 days later indicated that participation in the simulated patient case did not result in greater knowledge retention or comfort level than participation in the written patient case. Students' knowledge improved post-intervention regardless of which teaching method was used. Conclusions. Although further research is needed to determine whether the use of simulation in the PharmD curriculum is equivalent or superior to other teaching methods, students' enthusiasm for learning in a simulated environment where they can safely apply patient care skills make this technology worth exploring.

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