Phase IV

Late reconstruction abdominal wall closure: Staged management technique

Timothy C. Fabian

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

There has been an evolution in managing the laparotomy wound associated with devastating abdominal injuries over the past 25 years. The pathophysiology of the scenario resulting in intra-abdominal hypertension has been fairly well worked out in both laboratory models as well as in clinical observational studies. It has been observed that closure of the laparotomy incision under such circumstances results in a compartment syndrome. As an alternative to closure under tension, the development of multiple methods of open abdominal wound management has evolved. However, while this progress has positively influenced some of these problems, a new dilemma has emerged: the giant ventral hernia [1-6].

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationDamage Control Management in the Polytrauma Patient
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages239-247
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)9780387895079
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Abdominal Wall
Laparotomy
Intra-Abdominal Hypertension
Ventral Hernia
Compartment Syndromes
Abdominal Injuries
Wounds and Injuries
Observational Studies
Clinical Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Fabian, T. C. (2010). Phase IV: Late reconstruction abdominal wall closure: Staged management technique. In Damage Control Management in the Polytrauma Patient (pp. 239-247). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-89508-6_12

Phase IV : Late reconstruction abdominal wall closure: Staged management technique. / Fabian, Timothy C.

Damage Control Management in the Polytrauma Patient. Springer New York, 2010. p. 239-247.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Fabian, TC 2010, Phase IV: Late reconstruction abdominal wall closure: Staged management technique. in Damage Control Management in the Polytrauma Patient. Springer New York, pp. 239-247. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-89508-6_12
Fabian TC. Phase IV: Late reconstruction abdominal wall closure: Staged management technique. In Damage Control Management in the Polytrauma Patient. Springer New York. 2010. p. 239-247 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-89508-6_12
Fabian, Timothy C. / Phase IV : Late reconstruction abdominal wall closure: Staged management technique. Damage Control Management in the Polytrauma Patient. Springer New York, 2010. pp. 239-247
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