Physical activity, body composition, and blood pressure

A multimethod approach

Robert C. Klesges, Linda H. Eck, Terry R. Isbell, William Fulliton, Cindy L. Hanson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of the current investigation was to evaluate, using multiple measures of physical activity, the relationships among physical activity, body composition, resting heart rate, and blood pressure in an adult population. Subjects were 221 male (135 normal weight, 86 overweight) and 221 female (156 normal weight, 65 overweight) subjects participating in a longitudinal study of cardiovascular risk factors in families. All subjects were administered three physical activity questionnaires. Principal components analyses were conducted to reduce measures into empirically derived subscales; this analysis revealed five stable factors in men and four in women. Results indicated that aerobic/leisure time significantly correlated to body composition and resting heart rate in both men and women. Additionally, aerobic/leisure time activity was related to blood pressure in women, and moderate activity was related positively to blood pressure in men. No other form of activity (e.g., light activity, anaerobic activity) was related to either adiposity or blood pressure. The implications of these results are discussed, and future research directions are highlighted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)759-765
Number of pages7
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume23
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

Fingerprint

Body Composition
Exercise
Blood Pressure
Leisure Activities
Heart Rate
Weights and Measures
Adiposity
Principal Component Analysis
Longitudinal Studies
Light
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Klesges, R. C., Eck, L. H., Isbell, T. R., Fulliton, W., & Hanson, C. L. (1991). Physical activity, body composition, and blood pressure: A multimethod approach. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 23(6), 759-765.

Physical activity, body composition, and blood pressure : A multimethod approach. / Klesges, Robert C.; Eck, Linda H.; Isbell, Terry R.; Fulliton, William; Hanson, Cindy L.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 23, No. 6, 01.01.1991, p. 759-765.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klesges, RC, Eck, LH, Isbell, TR, Fulliton, W & Hanson, CL 1991, 'Physical activity, body composition, and blood pressure: A multimethod approach', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 23, no. 6, pp. 759-765.
Klesges RC, Eck LH, Isbell TR, Fulliton W, Hanson CL. Physical activity, body composition, and blood pressure: A multimethod approach. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 1991 Jan 1;23(6):759-765.
Klesges, Robert C. ; Eck, Linda H. ; Isbell, Terry R. ; Fulliton, William ; Hanson, Cindy L. / Physical activity, body composition, and blood pressure : A multimethod approach. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 1991 ; Vol. 23, No. 6. pp. 759-765.
@article{b3e73973c1af4a16af49e35846fad4ed,
title = "Physical activity, body composition, and blood pressure: A multimethod approach",
abstract = "The purpose of the current investigation was to evaluate, using multiple measures of physical activity, the relationships among physical activity, body composition, resting heart rate, and blood pressure in an adult population. Subjects were 221 male (135 normal weight, 86 overweight) and 221 female (156 normal weight, 65 overweight) subjects participating in a longitudinal study of cardiovascular risk factors in families. All subjects were administered three physical activity questionnaires. Principal components analyses were conducted to reduce measures into empirically derived subscales; this analysis revealed five stable factors in men and four in women. Results indicated that aerobic/leisure time significantly correlated to body composition and resting heart rate in both men and women. Additionally, aerobic/leisure time activity was related to blood pressure in women, and moderate activity was related positively to blood pressure in men. No other form of activity (e.g., light activity, anaerobic activity) was related to either adiposity or blood pressure. The implications of these results are discussed, and future research directions are highlighted.",
author = "Klesges, {Robert C.} and Eck, {Linda H.} and Isbell, {Terry R.} and William Fulliton and Hanson, {Cindy L.}",
year = "1991",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "759--765",
journal = "Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise",
issn = "0195-9131",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Physical activity, body composition, and blood pressure

T2 - A multimethod approach

AU - Klesges, Robert C.

AU - Eck, Linda H.

AU - Isbell, Terry R.

AU - Fulliton, William

AU - Hanson, Cindy L.

PY - 1991/1/1

Y1 - 1991/1/1

N2 - The purpose of the current investigation was to evaluate, using multiple measures of physical activity, the relationships among physical activity, body composition, resting heart rate, and blood pressure in an adult population. Subjects were 221 male (135 normal weight, 86 overweight) and 221 female (156 normal weight, 65 overweight) subjects participating in a longitudinal study of cardiovascular risk factors in families. All subjects were administered three physical activity questionnaires. Principal components analyses were conducted to reduce measures into empirically derived subscales; this analysis revealed five stable factors in men and four in women. Results indicated that aerobic/leisure time significantly correlated to body composition and resting heart rate in both men and women. Additionally, aerobic/leisure time activity was related to blood pressure in women, and moderate activity was related positively to blood pressure in men. No other form of activity (e.g., light activity, anaerobic activity) was related to either adiposity or blood pressure. The implications of these results are discussed, and future research directions are highlighted.

AB - The purpose of the current investigation was to evaluate, using multiple measures of physical activity, the relationships among physical activity, body composition, resting heart rate, and blood pressure in an adult population. Subjects were 221 male (135 normal weight, 86 overweight) and 221 female (156 normal weight, 65 overweight) subjects participating in a longitudinal study of cardiovascular risk factors in families. All subjects were administered three physical activity questionnaires. Principal components analyses were conducted to reduce measures into empirically derived subscales; this analysis revealed five stable factors in men and four in women. Results indicated that aerobic/leisure time significantly correlated to body composition and resting heart rate in both men and women. Additionally, aerobic/leisure time activity was related to blood pressure in women, and moderate activity was related positively to blood pressure in men. No other form of activity (e.g., light activity, anaerobic activity) was related to either adiposity or blood pressure. The implications of these results are discussed, and future research directions are highlighted.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025810689&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025810689&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 759

EP - 765

JO - Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

JF - Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

SN - 0195-9131

IS - 6

ER -