Physician knowledge and opinions about sexually transmitted infections and the human papillomavirus vaccine

a community based survey.

Christy F. Pearce, Lynlee Wolfe, Stephen E. DePasquale, J. Michael Breen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The new Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is targeted to pre-adolescents; therefore pediatric providers will be its most frequent supplier. METHODS: A survey focusing on physician knowledge and opinions about sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and the HPV vaccine was distributed to pediatric providers in Chattanooga, TN. RESULTS: Response rate of 171 distributed surveys was 59 percent. Most doctors rated their STI knowledge base as adequate (93 percent), felt comfortable counseling on STIs (80 percent), and felt comfortable counseling about the vaccine and administering it (78 percent). Most also felt the vaccine should be incorporated into the current pediatric vaccination schedule (63 percent) eventually for males and (females (63 percent), aged 10-14 years (54 percent). While four percent of respondents felt this vaccine might promote a false sense of security against STIs, none felt it would promote promiscuity. CONCLUSION: Most surveyed providers feel comfortable counseling their patients about STIs and support the current recommendations for the HPV vaccine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalTennessee medicine : journal of the Tennessee Medical Association
Volume102
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

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Papillomavirus Vaccines
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Physicians
Counseling
Vaccines
Pediatrics
Knowledge Bases
Appointments and Schedules
Vaccination
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Physician knowledge and opinions about sexually transmitted infections and the human papillomavirus vaccine : a community based survey. / Pearce, Christy F.; Wolfe, Lynlee; DePasquale, Stephen E.; Breen, J. Michael.

In: Tennessee medicine : journal of the Tennessee Medical Association, Vol. 102, No. 3, 01.01.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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