Physicians' diagnosis of obesity status in NHANES II

L. H. Eck, J. W. Ray, R. C. Klesges, G. E. Relyea, C. Hackett-Renner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this work was to assess the accuracy of physicians' subjective assessments of obesity status. The subjects were participants in The Second National Health and Nutrition Examination (NHANES II) Survey. The physicians' subjective judgments of obesity were compared to BMI, an objective measure of actual body mass. Subjects with a body mass index (BMI = weight in kg/(height in cm/100)2) less than or equal to 27.5 were classified as normal weight and those with a BMI greater than or equal to 30.4 were considered to be obese. Physicians were accurate in their diagnosis of the normal weight group with only 4.03% being misdiagnosed as obese. However, 12.6% of the obese group was misdiagnosed as normal weight. The odds of an incorrect normal weight diagnosis increased with age. Similarly, as the fat distribution ratio increased, i.e., a more central pattern, the odds of being actually obese but incorrectly diagnosed as normal weight increased. Men were more likely than women to be incorrectly diagnosed as normal weight. Non-Caucasian normal weight persons appear to have been diagnosed more stringently than Caucasians as they were more likely to be misdiagnosed as obese regardless of their gender. There appear to be several variables affecting the physicians' subjective assessment of obesity status in this data set.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)704-708
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
Volume18
Issue number10
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
Nutrition Surveys
physicians
obesity
Obesity
Physicians
Weights and Measures
Diagnostic Errors
Body Weights and Measures
body mass index
Body Mass Index
Fats
nutrition
gender
Health
lipids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Endocrinology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Eck, L. H., Ray, J. W., Klesges, R. C., Relyea, G. E., & Hackett-Renner, C. (1994). Physicians' diagnosis of obesity status in NHANES II. International Journal of Obesity, 18(10), 704-708.

Physicians' diagnosis of obesity status in NHANES II. / Eck, L. H.; Ray, J. W.; Klesges, R. C.; Relyea, G. E.; Hackett-Renner, C.

In: International Journal of Obesity, Vol. 18, No. 10, 1994, p. 704-708.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eck, LH, Ray, JW, Klesges, RC, Relyea, GE & Hackett-Renner, C 1994, 'Physicians' diagnosis of obesity status in NHANES II', International Journal of Obesity, vol. 18, no. 10, pp. 704-708.
Eck LH, Ray JW, Klesges RC, Relyea GE, Hackett-Renner C. Physicians' diagnosis of obesity status in NHANES II. International Journal of Obesity. 1994;18(10):704-708.
Eck, L. H. ; Ray, J. W. ; Klesges, R. C. ; Relyea, G. E. ; Hackett-Renner, C. / Physicians' diagnosis of obesity status in NHANES II. In: International Journal of Obesity. 1994 ; Vol. 18, No. 10. pp. 704-708.
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