Physiologic correlates of the heart rate response to upright isotonic exercise

Relevance to rate-responsive pacemakers

Patricia A. McElroy, Joseph S. Janicki, Karl Weber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rate-responsive cardiac pacing requires a sensitive physiologic variable that is closely correlated with the heart rate-oxygen uptake relation, particularly in patients with heart failure whose cardiac output response to exercise is more dependent on heart rate. Accordingly, the heart rate response to upright exercise was measured in 81 patients with heart failure or hypertension, or both, and in 27 normal subjects. Oxygen uptake (V̇O2), minute ventilation (V̇e), cardiac output, right heart pressures and the mixed venous temperature, oxygen saturation (SO2) and pH were analyzed throughout exercise. Linear regression analysis or these variables with heart rate revealed the following: 1) There was a highly linear heart rate-V̇O2 relation in each subject (the average slope of this relation was greater [p < 0.05] in patients with more severe failure). 2) V̇e was highly correlated with exercise heart rate, and its slope was not different between normal subjects and patients. 3) Mixed venous temperature and pH were poor predictors of exercise heart rate, particularly at low or moderate levels of work; however, SO2 was highly correlated with heart rate for all levels of work. Thus, in normal subjects and patients with heart failure or hypertension, or both, heart rate increases linearly with isotonic leg exercise. Minute ventilation and mixed venous oxygen saturation are highly correlated with this response and may serve as potential sensors for rate-responsive pacemakers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)94-99
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988
Externally publishedYes

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Heart Rate
Exercise
Oxygen
Ventilation
Heart Failure
Cardiac Output
Hypertension
Temperature
Venous Pressure
Linear Models
Leg
Regression Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Physiologic correlates of the heart rate response to upright isotonic exercise : Relevance to rate-responsive pacemakers. / McElroy, Patricia A.; Janicki, Joseph S.; Weber, Karl.

In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Vol. 11, No. 1, 01.01.1988, p. 94-99.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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