Physiological responses to lysophosphatidic acid and related glycero-phospholipids

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1-Acyl-2-hydroxy(lyso)-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (lysophosphatidic acid, LPA) has attracted a lot of attention in recent years due to the wide range of its biological effects that span the phylogenetic tree from slime mold to human. LPA can be viewed as a pleiotropic phospholipid growth factor that utilizes the same signal transduction mechanisms as traditional polypeptide growth factors; however, LPA activates these mechanism via specific G protein-coupled receptors. The concentration of LPA in serum is in the high micromolar range, making it the most abundant mitogen/survival factor present in serum, one that is often unknowingly utilized in tissue culture. The present review gives a historical perspective and a critical analysis of the LPA literature with a special emphasis on the physiological implications of its effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-62
Number of pages16
JournalProstaglandins and Other Lipid Mediators
Volume64
Issue number1-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2001

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Phospholipids
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Tissue culture
Signal transduction
G-Protein-Coupled Receptors
Fungi
Serum
Mitogens
Signal Transduction
Phosphates
lysophosphatidic acid
Peptides
Survival

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Biochemistry
  • Pharmacology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Physiological responses to lysophosphatidic acid and related glycero-phospholipids. / Tigyi, Gabor.

In: Prostaglandins and Other Lipid Mediators, Vol. 64, No. 1-4, 01.04.2001, p. 47-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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