Pilot-scale selenium bioremediation of San Joaquin drainage water with Thauera selenatis

Alex Cantafio, Kari D. Hagen, Greg E. Lewis, Tracey L. Bledsoe, Katrina M. Nunan, Joan M. Macy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

109 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This report describes a simple method for the bioremediation of selenium from agricultural drainage water. A medium-packed pilot-scale biological reactor system, inoculated with the selenate-respiring bacterium Thauera selenatis, was constructed at the Panoche Water District, San Joaquin Valley, Calif. The reactor was used to treat drainage water (7.6 liters/min) containing both selenium and nitrate. Acetate (5 mM) was the carbon source- electron donor reactor feed. Selenium oxyanion concentrations (selenate plus selenite) in the drainage water were reduced by 98%, to an average of 12 ± 9 fig/liter. Frequently (47% of the sampling days), reactor effluent concentrations of less than 5 μg/liter were achieved. Denitrification was also observed in this system; nitrate and nitrite concentrations in the drainage water were reduced to 0.1 and 0.01 mM, respectively (98% reduction). Analysis of the reactor effluent showed that 91 to 96% of the total selenium recovered was elemental selenium; 97.9% of this elemental selenium could be removed with Nalmet 8072, a new, commercially available precipitant- coagulant. Widespread use of this system (in the Grasslands Water District) could reduce the amount of selenium deposited in the San Joaquin River from 7,000 to 140 lb (ca. 3,000 to 60 kg)/year.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3298-3303
Number of pages6
JournalApplied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume62
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Thauera selenatis
Thauera
Environmental Biodegradation
bioremediation
drainage water
Selenium
selenium
Drainage
Water
Selenic Acid
selenate
selenates
Nitrates
effluents
San Joaquin River
nitrates
effluent
nitrate
Selenious Acid
Ficus

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Ecology

Cite this

Cantafio, A., Hagen, K. D., Lewis, G. E., Bledsoe, T. L., Nunan, K. M., & Macy, J. M. (1996). Pilot-scale selenium bioremediation of San Joaquin drainage water with Thauera selenatis. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 62(9), 3298-3303.

Pilot-scale selenium bioremediation of San Joaquin drainage water with Thauera selenatis. / Cantafio, Alex; Hagen, Kari D.; Lewis, Greg E.; Bledsoe, Tracey L.; Nunan, Katrina M.; Macy, Joan M.

In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 62, No. 9, 01.09.1996, p. 3298-3303.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cantafio, A, Hagen, KD, Lewis, GE, Bledsoe, TL, Nunan, KM & Macy, JM 1996, 'Pilot-scale selenium bioremediation of San Joaquin drainage water with Thauera selenatis', Applied and Environmental Microbiology, vol. 62, no. 9, pp. 3298-3303.
Cantafio, Alex ; Hagen, Kari D. ; Lewis, Greg E. ; Bledsoe, Tracey L. ; Nunan, Katrina M. ; Macy, Joan M. / Pilot-scale selenium bioremediation of San Joaquin drainage water with Thauera selenatis. In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 1996 ; Vol. 62, No. 9. pp. 3298-3303.
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