Placenta growth factor is not an early marker for the development of severe preeclampsia

Jeffrey C. Livingston, Bassam Haddad, Laura A. Gorski, Paul Neblett, Robert A. Ahokas, Risa Ramsey, Baha M. Sibai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to determine whether plasma concentrations of placenta growth factor may be used as a marker for women who ultimately have severe preeclampsia. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a nested case-control study to compare plasma concentrations of placenta growth factor in women with severe preeclampsia with the concentrations in normotensive pregnant control subjects. Plasma samples were collected at <20 weeks' gestation and again in the third trimester. Twenty-two women who ultimately had severe preeclampsia were matched for gestational age at delivery with 22 normotensive control subjects. Placenta growth factor concentrations were measured by a specific antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Comparisons were made by using the Mann-Whitney U test for nonparametric data such as placenta growth factor concentrations. The Student t test was used for parametric data. RESULTS: A total of 880 pregnant women were screened. Severe preeclampsia developed in 22, for an incidence of 2.5%. As expected, women with severe preeclampsia had significantly higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and their infants had lower birth weights. Placental weights at delivery were similar between those with severe preeclampsia and control subjects (659 vs 699 g; P = .51). During the third trimester, the median placenta growth factor concentrations were significantly lower in women with severe preeclampsia than in normotensive control subjects (125 vs 449 pg/mL; P = .003). When samples drawn at <20 weeks' gestation were compared, there was no difference between the group with severe preeclampsia and those who remained normotensive (98.8 vs 56.34 pg/mL; P = .15). CONCLUSION: During the third trimester, patients with severe preeclampsia have decreased maternal concentrations of placenta growth factor. This difference is not seen earlier in pregnancy. Lower concentrations of placenta growth factor may be a result of severe preeclampsia rather than a causal factor. Placenta growth factor is not a good marker for the subsequent development of severe preeclampsia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1218-1220
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume184
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

Fingerprint

Pre-Eclampsia
Third Pregnancy Trimester
Pregnancy
Placenta Growth Factor
Blood Pressure
Nonparametric Statistics
Birth Weight
Gestational Age
Case-Control Studies
Pregnant Women
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Mothers
Students
Antigens
Weights and Measures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Placenta growth factor is not an early marker for the development of severe preeclampsia. / Livingston, Jeffrey C.; Haddad, Bassam; Gorski, Laura A.; Neblett, Paul; Ahokas, Robert A.; Ramsey, Risa; Sibai, Baha M.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 184, No. 6, 01.01.2001, p. 1218-1220.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Livingston, Jeffrey C. ; Haddad, Bassam ; Gorski, Laura A. ; Neblett, Paul ; Ahokas, Robert A. ; Ramsey, Risa ; Sibai, Baha M. / Placenta growth factor is not an early marker for the development of severe preeclampsia. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2001 ; Vol. 184, No. 6. pp. 1218-1220.
@article{7f5c04403baa4bc0995d7ba7482ed63d,
title = "Placenta growth factor is not an early marker for the development of severe preeclampsia",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to determine whether plasma concentrations of placenta growth factor may be used as a marker for women who ultimately have severe preeclampsia. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a nested case-control study to compare plasma concentrations of placenta growth factor in women with severe preeclampsia with the concentrations in normotensive pregnant control subjects. Plasma samples were collected at <20 weeks' gestation and again in the third trimester. Twenty-two women who ultimately had severe preeclampsia were matched for gestational age at delivery with 22 normotensive control subjects. Placenta growth factor concentrations were measured by a specific antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Comparisons were made by using the Mann-Whitney U test for nonparametric data such as placenta growth factor concentrations. The Student t test was used for parametric data. RESULTS: A total of 880 pregnant women were screened. Severe preeclampsia developed in 22, for an incidence of 2.5{\%}. As expected, women with severe preeclampsia had significantly higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and their infants had lower birth weights. Placental weights at delivery were similar between those with severe preeclampsia and control subjects (659 vs 699 g; P = .51). During the third trimester, the median placenta growth factor concentrations were significantly lower in women with severe preeclampsia than in normotensive control subjects (125 vs 449 pg/mL; P = .003). When samples drawn at <20 weeks' gestation were compared, there was no difference between the group with severe preeclampsia and those who remained normotensive (98.8 vs 56.34 pg/mL; P = .15). CONCLUSION: During the third trimester, patients with severe preeclampsia have decreased maternal concentrations of placenta growth factor. This difference is not seen earlier in pregnancy. Lower concentrations of placenta growth factor may be a result of severe preeclampsia rather than a causal factor. Placenta growth factor is not a good marker for the subsequent development of severe preeclampsia.",
author = "Livingston, {Jeffrey C.} and Bassam Haddad and Gorski, {Laura A.} and Paul Neblett and Ahokas, {Robert A.} and Risa Ramsey and Sibai, {Baha M.}",
year = "2001",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1067/mob.2001.113877",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "184",
pages = "1218--1220",
journal = "American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology",
issn = "0002-9378",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Placenta growth factor is not an early marker for the development of severe preeclampsia

AU - Livingston, Jeffrey C.

AU - Haddad, Bassam

AU - Gorski, Laura A.

AU - Neblett, Paul

AU - Ahokas, Robert A.

AU - Ramsey, Risa

AU - Sibai, Baha M.

PY - 2001/1/1

Y1 - 2001/1/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to determine whether plasma concentrations of placenta growth factor may be used as a marker for women who ultimately have severe preeclampsia. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a nested case-control study to compare plasma concentrations of placenta growth factor in women with severe preeclampsia with the concentrations in normotensive pregnant control subjects. Plasma samples were collected at <20 weeks' gestation and again in the third trimester. Twenty-two women who ultimately had severe preeclampsia were matched for gestational age at delivery with 22 normotensive control subjects. Placenta growth factor concentrations were measured by a specific antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Comparisons were made by using the Mann-Whitney U test for nonparametric data such as placenta growth factor concentrations. The Student t test was used for parametric data. RESULTS: A total of 880 pregnant women were screened. Severe preeclampsia developed in 22, for an incidence of 2.5%. As expected, women with severe preeclampsia had significantly higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and their infants had lower birth weights. Placental weights at delivery were similar between those with severe preeclampsia and control subjects (659 vs 699 g; P = .51). During the third trimester, the median placenta growth factor concentrations were significantly lower in women with severe preeclampsia than in normotensive control subjects (125 vs 449 pg/mL; P = .003). When samples drawn at <20 weeks' gestation were compared, there was no difference between the group with severe preeclampsia and those who remained normotensive (98.8 vs 56.34 pg/mL; P = .15). CONCLUSION: During the third trimester, patients with severe preeclampsia have decreased maternal concentrations of placenta growth factor. This difference is not seen earlier in pregnancy. Lower concentrations of placenta growth factor may be a result of severe preeclampsia rather than a causal factor. Placenta growth factor is not a good marker for the subsequent development of severe preeclampsia.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to determine whether plasma concentrations of placenta growth factor may be used as a marker for women who ultimately have severe preeclampsia. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a nested case-control study to compare plasma concentrations of placenta growth factor in women with severe preeclampsia with the concentrations in normotensive pregnant control subjects. Plasma samples were collected at <20 weeks' gestation and again in the third trimester. Twenty-two women who ultimately had severe preeclampsia were matched for gestational age at delivery with 22 normotensive control subjects. Placenta growth factor concentrations were measured by a specific antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Comparisons were made by using the Mann-Whitney U test for nonparametric data such as placenta growth factor concentrations. The Student t test was used for parametric data. RESULTS: A total of 880 pregnant women were screened. Severe preeclampsia developed in 22, for an incidence of 2.5%. As expected, women with severe preeclampsia had significantly higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and their infants had lower birth weights. Placental weights at delivery were similar between those with severe preeclampsia and control subjects (659 vs 699 g; P = .51). During the third trimester, the median placenta growth factor concentrations were significantly lower in women with severe preeclampsia than in normotensive control subjects (125 vs 449 pg/mL; P = .003). When samples drawn at <20 weeks' gestation were compared, there was no difference between the group with severe preeclampsia and those who remained normotensive (98.8 vs 56.34 pg/mL; P = .15). CONCLUSION: During the third trimester, patients with severe preeclampsia have decreased maternal concentrations of placenta growth factor. This difference is not seen earlier in pregnancy. Lower concentrations of placenta growth factor may be a result of severe preeclampsia rather than a causal factor. Placenta growth factor is not a good marker for the subsequent development of severe preeclampsia.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035339661&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035339661&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1067/mob.2001.113877

DO - 10.1067/mob.2001.113877

M3 - Article

VL - 184

SP - 1218

EP - 1220

JO - American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

JF - American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

SN - 0002-9378

IS - 6

ER -