Plasma Carnitine Alterations in Premature Infants Receiving Various Nutritional Regimes

Rebecca B. Smith, Dileep S. Sachan, Joan Plattsmier, Neil Feld, Vichien Lorch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plasma carnitine, carnitine esters, and triglyceride concentrations were determined in 36 appropriate-for-gestational-age (AGA) infants at various stages of prematurity throughout hospitalization to determine the effect of a carnitine-free and carnitine-containing diet on plasma carnitine and triglyceride concentrations. The infants were entered into one of three experimental groups based on birth weight: group I <1.0 kg; group II 1.0-1.51 kg; and group III 1.52-2.5 kg. Throughout the study subjects were placed on appropriate nutritional regimes which included hyperalimentation (HA), intravenous (iv) fat emulsion (Intralipid), Portagen, Enfamil-24 Premature Formula, Enfamil-20, and breastmilk. Blood samples were drawn from each infant at birth, days 1-5,7 then weekly, also before and after each nutritional intervention to determine carnitine and triglyceride concentrations. Results showed that plasma total carnitine and nonesterified carnitine decreased in all groups when the infants were maintained on a carnitine-free diet (HA, Intralipid, Portagen). In general, the carnitine levels continued to decrease until a carnitine-containing diet was initiated. Once a carnitine-containing diet was begun, plasma total carnitine (TC) and nonesterified carnitine (NEC) levels increased at fairly similar rates in all groups. However, an inverse relationship between carnitine and triglyceride (TG) concentrations were not seen in these infants. This would indicate that most premature infants require exogenous carnitine to maintain the plasma concentration of carnitine. However, a decreased concentration of plasma carnitine was not correlated with an elevated TG level under the conditions of this study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-42
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988
Externally publishedYes

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Carnitine
Premature Infants
Triglycerides
Diet
Intravenous Fat Emulsions

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Plasma Carnitine Alterations in Premature Infants Receiving Various Nutritional Regimes. / Smith, Rebecca B.; Sachan, Dileep S.; Plattsmier, Joan; Feld, Neil; Lorch, Vichien.

In: Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, Vol. 12, No. 1, 01.01.1988, p. 37-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, Rebecca B. ; Sachan, Dileep S. ; Plattsmier, Joan ; Feld, Neil ; Lorch, Vichien. / Plasma Carnitine Alterations in Premature Infants Receiving Various Nutritional Regimes. In: Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. 1988 ; Vol. 12, No. 1. pp. 37-42.
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