Plasma carnitine concentration and lipid metabolism in infants receiving parenteral nutrition

Michael Christensen, Richard Helms, Elizabeth C. Mauer, Michael C. Storm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relationships among plasma total carnitine concentration, postnatal age, and fatty acid metabolism were evaluated in 57 infants receiving parenteral nutrition. Concentrations of plasma carnitine, triglycerides, free fatty acids, acetoacetate, and β-hydroxybutyrate were determined before and at 2 and 4 hours from the beginning of a standardized 2-hour lipid infusion. Plasma carnitine concentrations declined with increasing postnatal age. There were no significant differences in gestational age or triglyceride concentrations between infants <-4 weeks of age and those >4 weeks of age, whereas free fatty acid concentrations were lower and acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were higher in the younger infants. Infants <-4 weeks of age were further grouped according to plasma carnitine concentration >13 nmol/ml (group 1) and <-13 nmol/ml (group 2) and were then compared with infants >4 weeks of age (group 3). There were no significant differences in triglyceride concentrations among the three groups; free fatty acids, acetoacetate, and β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations for group 2 patients were similar to those of group 1 patients or fell between values for group 1 and group 3 patients. These results demonstrate decreasing plasma carnitine concentrations and possibly impalred fatty acid metabolism in infants maintained on carnitine-free nutrients for more than 4 weeks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)794-798
Number of pages5
JournalThe Journal of Pediatrics
Volume115
Issue number5 PART 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989

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Carnitine
Parenteral Nutrition
Lipid Metabolism
Hydroxybutyrates
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Triglycerides
Fatty Acids
Gestational Age
Age Groups
Lipids
Food
acetoacetic acid

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Plasma carnitine concentration and lipid metabolism in infants receiving parenteral nutrition. / Christensen, Michael; Helms, Richard; Mauer, Elizabeth C.; Storm, Michael C.

In: The Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 115, No. 5 PART 1, 01.01.1989, p. 794-798.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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