Polyester (Parietex) mesh for total extraperitoneal laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair

Initial experience in the United States

Bruce Ramshaw, F. Abiad, G. Voeller, R. Wilson, E. Mason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Polypropylene mesh is the most commonly used mesh for open and laparoscopic hernia repair in the United States. A variety of newly developed polyester mesh products have recently become available. This is the first U.S. multiinstitutional study evaluating the initial experience of polyester mesh use for total extraperitoneal (TEP) laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. Between January 2000 and June 2001, 337 patients underwent 495 TEP laparoscopic inguinal hernia repairs using polyester mesh. There were 309 men and 28 women in the study, whose average age was 45 years (range, 17-80 years). The average operative time for all cases was 54.3 min (range, 18-157 min). There were no conversions to open repair and no mortality. Complications included 12 seromas/hematomas (six aspirated), chronic pain in three patients, urinary retention in two patients, and one incidence each of the following: epididimitis, prostatitis, hydrocele, and port-site cellulitis. Additionally, one patient had carbon dioxide (CO2) in the Foley bag at the end of the surgery, but a normal cystogram showed no identified bladder injury. There has been one recurrence (0.2%), occurring 4 months after surgery, which was repaired using a transabdominal laparoscopic approach. The mean follow-up period was 11 months (range, 2-22 months). There have been no documented infections of the mesh, and no mesh has been removed. This study documents a favorable initial experience with polyester mesh for TEP laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. There were no complications related to the mesh. There may be technical and long-term advantages with the use of polyester mesh for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. Longer follow-up evaluation and additional studies are warranted to evaluate these potential advantages.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)498-501
Number of pages4
JournalSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2003

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Polyesters
Inguinal Hernia
Herniorrhaphy
Seroma
Prostatitis
Cellulitis
Urinary Retention
Polypropylenes
Operative Time
Carbon Dioxide
Chronic Pain
Hematoma
Urinary Bladder
parietex
Recurrence
Mortality
Incidence
Wounds and Injuries
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Polyester (Parietex) mesh for total extraperitoneal laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair : Initial experience in the United States. / Ramshaw, Bruce; Abiad, F.; Voeller, G.; Wilson, R.; Mason, E.

In: Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques, Vol. 17, No. 3, 01.03.2003, p. 498-501.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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