Polymerization shrinkage

Effects of boundary conditions and filling technique of resin composite restorations

Alessandro Dourado Loguercio, Alessandra Reis, Marcos Schroeder, Ivan Balducci, Antheunis Versluis, Rafael Yagüe Ballester

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the linear polymerization shrinkage (LPS) and the effect of polymerization shrinkage of a resin composite and resin-dentin bond strength under different boundary conditions and filling techniques. Methods: Two cavities (4×4×2 mm3) were prepared in bovine incisors (n=30). The teeth were divided into three groups, according to boundary conditions: In group TE, the total-etch technique was used. In group EE, only enamel was conditioned, and in group NE, none of the walls of the cavities were conditioned. A two-step adhesive system was applied to all cavities. The resin composite was inserted in one (B) or three increments (I), and light-cured with 600 mW/cm2 (80 s). The LPS (%) was measured in the top-bottom direction, by placing a probe in contact with resin composite during curing. Enamel and total mean gap widths were measured (400×) in three slices obtained after sectioning the restorations. Then, the slices were sectioned again, either to obtain sticks from the adhesive interface from the bottom of the cavity or to obtain resin composite sticks (0.8 mm2) to be tested for tensile strength (Kratos machine, 0.5 mm/min). The data was subjected to a two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test for comparison of the means (α=0.05). Results: The highest percentage of LPS was found for the TE when bulk filled, and the lowest percentage of LPS was found in the EE and NE when incrementally filled. The resin-dentin bond strength was higher and the total mean gap width was lower for TE group; no significant effect was detected for the main factor filling techniques. No difference was detected for the tensile strength of resin composite among the experimental groups. Conclusions: The filling technique is not able to minimize effects of the polymerization shrinkage, and bonding to the cavity walls is necessary to assure reduced mean gap width and high bond strength values.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-470
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Dentistry
Volume32
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Composite Resins
Polymerization
Tensile Strength
Dentin
Dental Enamel
Adhesives
Incisor
Analysis of Variance
Tooth
Light

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Polymerization shrinkage : Effects of boundary conditions and filling technique of resin composite restorations. / Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Reis, Alessandra; Schroeder, Marcos; Balducci, Ivan; Versluis, Antheunis; Ballester, Rafael Yagüe.

In: Journal of Dentistry, Vol. 32, No. 6, 01.08.2004, p. 459-470.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado ; Reis, Alessandra ; Schroeder, Marcos ; Balducci, Ivan ; Versluis, Antheunis ; Ballester, Rafael Yagüe. / Polymerization shrinkage : Effects of boundary conditions and filling technique of resin composite restorations. In: Journal of Dentistry. 2004 ; Vol. 32, No. 6. pp. 459-470.
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abstract = "Objective: To evaluate the linear polymerization shrinkage (LPS) and the effect of polymerization shrinkage of a resin composite and resin-dentin bond strength under different boundary conditions and filling techniques. Methods: Two cavities (4×4×2 mm3) were prepared in bovine incisors (n=30). The teeth were divided into three groups, according to boundary conditions: In group TE, the total-etch technique was used. In group EE, only enamel was conditioned, and in group NE, none of the walls of the cavities were conditioned. A two-step adhesive system was applied to all cavities. The resin composite was inserted in one (B) or three increments (I), and light-cured with 600 mW/cm2 (80 s). The LPS ({\%}) was measured in the top-bottom direction, by placing a probe in contact with resin composite during curing. Enamel and total mean gap widths were measured (400×) in three slices obtained after sectioning the restorations. Then, the slices were sectioned again, either to obtain sticks from the adhesive interface from the bottom of the cavity or to obtain resin composite sticks (0.8 mm2) to be tested for tensile strength (Kratos machine, 0.5 mm/min). The data was subjected to a two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test for comparison of the means (α=0.05). Results: The highest percentage of LPS was found for the TE when bulk filled, and the lowest percentage of LPS was found in the EE and NE when incrementally filled. The resin-dentin bond strength was higher and the total mean gap width was lower for TE group; no significant effect was detected for the main factor filling techniques. No difference was detected for the tensile strength of resin composite among the experimental groups. Conclusions: The filling technique is not able to minimize effects of the polymerization shrinkage, and bonding to the cavity walls is necessary to assure reduced mean gap width and high bond strength values.",
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AU - Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado

AU - Reis, Alessandra

AU - Schroeder, Marcos

AU - Balducci, Ivan

AU - Versluis, Antheunis

AU - Ballester, Rafael Yagüe

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N2 - Objective: To evaluate the linear polymerization shrinkage (LPS) and the effect of polymerization shrinkage of a resin composite and resin-dentin bond strength under different boundary conditions and filling techniques. Methods: Two cavities (4×4×2 mm3) were prepared in bovine incisors (n=30). The teeth were divided into three groups, according to boundary conditions: In group TE, the total-etch technique was used. In group EE, only enamel was conditioned, and in group NE, none of the walls of the cavities were conditioned. A two-step adhesive system was applied to all cavities. The resin composite was inserted in one (B) or three increments (I), and light-cured with 600 mW/cm2 (80 s). The LPS (%) was measured in the top-bottom direction, by placing a probe in contact with resin composite during curing. Enamel and total mean gap widths were measured (400×) in three slices obtained after sectioning the restorations. Then, the slices were sectioned again, either to obtain sticks from the adhesive interface from the bottom of the cavity or to obtain resin composite sticks (0.8 mm2) to be tested for tensile strength (Kratos machine, 0.5 mm/min). The data was subjected to a two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test for comparison of the means (α=0.05). Results: The highest percentage of LPS was found for the TE when bulk filled, and the lowest percentage of LPS was found in the EE and NE when incrementally filled. The resin-dentin bond strength was higher and the total mean gap width was lower for TE group; no significant effect was detected for the main factor filling techniques. No difference was detected for the tensile strength of resin composite among the experimental groups. Conclusions: The filling technique is not able to minimize effects of the polymerization shrinkage, and bonding to the cavity walls is necessary to assure reduced mean gap width and high bond strength values.

AB - Objective: To evaluate the linear polymerization shrinkage (LPS) and the effect of polymerization shrinkage of a resin composite and resin-dentin bond strength under different boundary conditions and filling techniques. Methods: Two cavities (4×4×2 mm3) were prepared in bovine incisors (n=30). The teeth were divided into three groups, according to boundary conditions: In group TE, the total-etch technique was used. In group EE, only enamel was conditioned, and in group NE, none of the walls of the cavities were conditioned. A two-step adhesive system was applied to all cavities. The resin composite was inserted in one (B) or three increments (I), and light-cured with 600 mW/cm2 (80 s). The LPS (%) was measured in the top-bottom direction, by placing a probe in contact with resin composite during curing. Enamel and total mean gap widths were measured (400×) in three slices obtained after sectioning the restorations. Then, the slices were sectioned again, either to obtain sticks from the adhesive interface from the bottom of the cavity or to obtain resin composite sticks (0.8 mm2) to be tested for tensile strength (Kratos machine, 0.5 mm/min). The data was subjected to a two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test for comparison of the means (α=0.05). Results: The highest percentage of LPS was found for the TE when bulk filled, and the lowest percentage of LPS was found in the EE and NE when incrementally filled. The resin-dentin bond strength was higher and the total mean gap width was lower for TE group; no significant effect was detected for the main factor filling techniques. No difference was detected for the tensile strength of resin composite among the experimental groups. Conclusions: The filling technique is not able to minimize effects of the polymerization shrinkage, and bonding to the cavity walls is necessary to assure reduced mean gap width and high bond strength values.

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