Polyprenyl immunostimulant treatment of cats with presumptive non-effusive feline infectious peritonitis in a field study

Alfred M. Legendre, Tanya Kuritz, Gina Galyon, Vivian M. Baylor, Robert Heidel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal disease with no clinically effective treatment. This field study evaluated treatment with Polyprenyl Immunostimulant (PI) in cats with the non-effusive form of FIP. Because immune suppression is a major component in the pathology of FIP, we hypothesized that treatment with an immune system stimulant would increase survival times of cats with dry FIP. Sixty cats, diagnosed with dry FIP by primary care and specialist veterinarians and meeting the acceptance criteria, were treated with PI without intentional selection of less severe cases. The survival time from the start of PI treatment in cats diagnosed with dry FIP showed that of the 60 cats with dry FIP treated with PI, 8 survived over 200 days, and 4 of 60 survived over 300 days. A literature search identified 59 cats with non-effusive or dry FIP; no cat with only dry FIP lived longer than 200 days. Veterinarians of cats treated with PI that survived over 30 days reported improvements in clinical signs and behavior. The survival times in our study were significantly longer in cats who were not treated with corticosteroids concurrently with PI. While not a cure, PI shows promise in the treatment of dry form FIP, but a controlled study will be needed to verify the benefit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number7
JournalFrontiers in Veterinary Science
Volume4
Issue numberFEB
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 14 2017

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Feline Infectious Peritonitis
feline infectious peritonitis
Immunologic Adjuvants
immunostimulants
Cats
cats
Therapeutics
Veterinarians
veterinarians
adrenal cortex hormones
immune system
Immune System
Primary Health Care
Adrenal Cortex Hormones

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Polyprenyl immunostimulant treatment of cats with presumptive non-effusive feline infectious peritonitis in a field study. / Legendre, Alfred M.; Kuritz, Tanya; Galyon, Gina; Baylor, Vivian M.; Heidel, Robert.

In: Frontiers in Veterinary Science, Vol. 4, No. FEB, 7, 14.02.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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