Pontine-wave generator

A key player in REM sleep-dependent memory consolidation

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The data outlined in this chapter provides evidence to support a concept that the activation of pontine-wave (P-wave) generating neurons plays a critical role in long-term memory formation. The P-wave, generated by the phasic activation of glutamatergic neurons in the pons, is one of the most prominent phasic events of REM sleep. These P-wave generating neurons project to the hippocampus, amygdala, entorhinal cortex and many other regions of the brain known to be involved in cognitive processing. These P-wave generating glutamatergic neurons remain silent during wakefulness and slow-wave sleep (SWS), but during the transition from SWS to REM sleep and throughout REM sleep these neurons discharge high-frequency spike bursts in the background of tonically increased firing rates. Activation of these P-wave generating neurons increases glutamate release and activates postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors in the dorsal hippocampus. Activation of P-wave generating neurons increases phosphorylation of transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in the dorsal hippocampus and amygdala by activating intracellular protein kinase A (PKA). The P-wave generating neurons activation-dependent PKA-CREB phosphorylation increases the expression of activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and early growth response-1 (Egr-1) genes in the dorsal hippocampus and amygdala. The P-wave generator activation-induced increased activation of PKA and expression of pCREB, Arc, BDNF, and Egr-1 in the dorsal hippocampus is shown to be necessary for REM sleep-dependent memory processing. Continued research on P-wave generation and its functions may provide new advances in understanding memory and treating its disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationRapid Eye Movement Sleep
Subtitle of host publicationRegulation and Function
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages140-150
Number of pages11
ISBN (Electronic)9780511921179
ISBN (Print)9780521116800
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

REM Sleep
Neurons
Hippocampus
Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases
Amygdala
Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
Sleep
Phosphorylation
Entorhinal Cortex
Pons
Long-Term Memory
Memory Consolidation
Wakefulness
N-Methylaspartate
Growth
Glutamic Acid
Transcription Factors
Brain
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Datta, S. (2011). Pontine-wave generator: A key player in REM sleep-dependent memory consolidation. In Rapid Eye Movement Sleep: Regulation and Function (pp. 140-150). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511921179.017

Pontine-wave generator : A key player in REM sleep-dependent memory consolidation. / Datta, Subimal.

Rapid Eye Movement Sleep: Regulation and Function. Cambridge University Press, 2011. p. 140-150.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Datta, S 2011, Pontine-wave generator: A key player in REM sleep-dependent memory consolidation. in Rapid Eye Movement Sleep: Regulation and Function. Cambridge University Press, pp. 140-150. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511921179.017
Datta S. Pontine-wave generator: A key player in REM sleep-dependent memory consolidation. In Rapid Eye Movement Sleep: Regulation and Function. Cambridge University Press. 2011. p. 140-150 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511921179.017
Datta, Subimal. / Pontine-wave generator : A key player in REM sleep-dependent memory consolidation. Rapid Eye Movement Sleep: Regulation and Function. Cambridge University Press, 2011. pp. 140-150
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