Positive-pressure ventilation alters blood-to-brain and blood-to-CSF transport in neonatal pigs

R. Mirro, Charles Leffler, W. M. Armstead, D. W. Busija

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

These experiments examine the transfer of sucrose, urea, sodium, and albumin from blood to brain in newborn pigs exposed to an increase in ventilation pressure. We also studied the movement of urea and sodium from blood to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). By use of a standard time-cycled pressure-limited infant respirator, mean airway pressure (P̄aw) was increased from ~ 3 to 17 cmH2O. Urea and albumin transfer into the brain were unchanged with increased P̄aw. Sodium transport decreased significantly in all brain regions, while sucrose transfer was increased in the cerebrum [transfer constant (K(in)) = 3.5 ± 0.04 vs. 9.9 ± 1.0 cm3 · g-1 · s-1 · 106] at the increased Paw. Transport of urea and sodium from blood to CSF decreased to half of control values with increased P̄aw. Thus, in newborn pigs, increasing P̄aw selectively alters blood-to-brain transport. In addition, movement of tracers from blood to CSF was severely restricted, possibly by a decrease in CSF production. It appears likely that the increased cerebral venous pressure causes the observed changes in tracer transport. Such altered blood-to-brain transport could adversely affect neuronal function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)584-589
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume70
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1991

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Positive-Pressure Respiration
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Swine
Urea
Brain
Sodium
Pressure
Sucrose
Albumins
Venous Pressure
Cerebrum
Mechanical Ventilators
Ventilation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology
  • Physiology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Positive-pressure ventilation alters blood-to-brain and blood-to-CSF transport in neonatal pigs. / Mirro, R.; Leffler, Charles; Armstead, W. M.; Busija, D. W.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 70, No. 2, 1991, p. 584-589.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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