Post interventional cardiology urinary thromboxane correlates with PlateletMapping® detected aspirin resistance

Roger C. Carroll, Ronald E. Worthington, Robert Craft, Carolyn C. Snider, Patrick A. Dakin, Dale Wortham, Jason Scott, Ashley Jarrett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: We have previously defined aspirin resistance detected by TEG PlateletMapping using arachidonic acid (AA). This aspirin resistance is observed as platelet activation (> 20%) by AA in whole blood, even though the isolated platelets are inhibited by aspirin. This platelet activation in whole blood is due to a transcellular pathway mediated by platelets and leukocytes. Methods: To determine if this PlateletMapping assay of aspirin resistance on pre-procedure blood samples correlated with an in vivo response we assayed the first voided urine samples collected 2-8 hours post interventional cardiology procedures for 11-dehydro thromboxane B2. Results and Conclusions: We detected 27 aspirin resistant patients out of a total of 81 (33%), in agreement with our previous study. All of these patients were on aspirin therapy, confirmed by a < 20% aggregation response to AA by light transmission platelet aggregometry using isolated platelet rich plasma. Aspirin resistant patients urine samples (14 out of a total of 60 patients analyzed) contained significantly (P = 0.008) higher 11-dehydro thromboxane B2 levels than the other 46 aspirin sensitive patients urine samples. Since our previous study implicated 12- and 15-lipoxygenases in this pathway, we also assayed for polymorphisms to determine any correlation with aspirin resistance. A correlation was found in a polymorphism affecting the lipoxygenase domain of platelet 12-lipoxygenase. This result indicates that aspirin resistance detected in whole blood by the TEG PlateletMapping assay correlates with a physiological consequence in terms of thromboxane formation. This is the first report of such a correlation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalThrombosis Research
Volume125
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2010

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Thromboxanes
Cardiology
Aspirin
Blood Platelets
Arachidonic Acid
Platelet Activation
Urine
Arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase
Transcytosis
Platelet-Rich Plasma
Lipoxygenase
Leukocytes
Light

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hematology

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Post interventional cardiology urinary thromboxane correlates with PlateletMapping® detected aspirin resistance. / Carroll, Roger C.; Worthington, Ronald E.; Craft, Robert; Snider, Carolyn C.; Dakin, Patrick A.; Wortham, Dale; Scott, Jason; Jarrett, Ashley.

In: Thrombosis Research, Vol. 125, No. 4, 01.04.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carroll, Roger C. ; Worthington, Ronald E. ; Craft, Robert ; Snider, Carolyn C. ; Dakin, Patrick A. ; Wortham, Dale ; Scott, Jason ; Jarrett, Ashley. / Post interventional cardiology urinary thromboxane correlates with PlateletMapping® detected aspirin resistance. In: Thrombosis Research. 2010 ; Vol. 125, No. 4.
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