Post-radical prostatectomy penile blood flow

Assessment with color flow Doppler ultrasound

Edward Kim, D. Blackburn, K. T. McVary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cadaveric dissections have revealed that accessory blood vessels to the penis often arise near or through the apex of the prostate. These accessory vessels may be easily injured during radical prostatectomy. Increasing attention since the 1980s has focused on preserving potency after radical prostatectomy with a nerve sparing technique. However, many patients are impotent even after a nerve sparing procedure. An arterial, venous or psychological mechanism may be involved. A prospective study was designed to assess cavernous artery diameter, peak systolic flow velocity, penile blood flow, end diastolic flow velocity and resistance index preoperatively and postoperatively in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Ten patients with a mean age of 60 years were evaluated, of whom 8 underwent a unilateral nerve sparing procedure, 1 bilateral nerve sparing procedure and 1 bilateral nonnerve sparing procedure. Mean penile blood flow as calculated by the formula penile blood flow = peak systolic flow velocity x π (diameter/2)2 increased 0.33 ml. per second (+26%) on the nerve spared side, while diminishing 0.68 ml. per second (-41%) on the nonspared side. Overall penile blood flow was diminished. End diastolic flow velocity increased on spared and nonspared sides after surgery. The resistance index for all radical prostatectomy patients diminished 7% from 0.83 preoperatively to 0.77 postoperatively (p = 0.16). While these findings were not statistically significant, they suggest that arterial insufficiency and corporeal venous occlusive dysfunction may be involved in sexual dysfunction after nerve sparing radical prostatectomy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2276-2279
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume152
Issue number6 II
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

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Doppler Ultrasonography
Prostatectomy
Color
Blood Flow Velocity
Venous Insufficiency
Penis
Blood Vessels
Dissection
Prostate
Arteries
Prospective Studies
Psychology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Urology

Cite this

Post-radical prostatectomy penile blood flow : Assessment with color flow Doppler ultrasound. / Kim, Edward; Blackburn, D.; McVary, K. T.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 152, No. 6 II, 01.01.1994, p. 2276-2279.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, Edward ; Blackburn, D. ; McVary, K. T. / Post-radical prostatectomy penile blood flow : Assessment with color flow Doppler ultrasound. In: Journal of Urology. 1994 ; Vol. 152, No. 6 II. pp. 2276-2279.
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