Post-resuscitation arterial blood pressure on survival and change of capillary density following cardiac arrest and resuscitation in rats

Kui Xu, Michelle Puchowicz, Joseph C. LaManna

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Transient global brain ischemia, induced by cardiac arrest and resuscitation, results in reperfusion injury leading to delayed selective neuronal cell loss and post-resuscitation mortality. This study determined the effects of post-resuscitation hypotension and hypothermia on long-term survival following cardiac arrest and resuscitation. The capillary density was also determined. Based on the mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) at 1 h of recovery, the normotension group (MABP 80–120 mmHg) and hypotension group (MABP <80 mmHg) were defined. The overall survival was determined at 4 days of recovery. Brain microvascular density was assessed using immunohistochemistry of the glucose transporter, GLUT-1. The pre-arrest MABP was similar in each group; at 1 h after resuscitation, the MABP in the normotension groups was about 80% of their pre-arrest values; the hypotension group had a significantly lower MABP compared to the normotension group. The overall survival rate was lower in the hypotension group compared to the normotension group (36%, 4/11 vs. 67%, 14/21) under the normothermic condition. Brain blood flow in the hypotension group was lower (33% decrease) compared to the normotension group at 1-h post-resuscitation. Compared to the pre-arrest baseline, the capillary density was significantly increased at 14 days of recovery (355 ± 42 vs. 469 ± 50, number/mm2) in the cortex. The capillary density in hippocampus was also increased at 4–30 days following cardiac arrest and resuscitation. Our results suggest that rats able to maintain their post-resuscitation blood pressure at normotension, had higher brain blood flow during the early recovery phase, and improved survival outcome following cardiac arrest and resuscitation. In addition, cardiac arrest and resuscitation induced angiogenesis in brain in the first month of recovery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
PublisherSpringer New York LLC
Pages77-82
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Publication series

NameAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Volume1072
ISSN (Print)0065-2598
ISSN (Electronic)2214-8019

Fingerprint

Resuscitation
Blood pressure
Heart Arrest
Rats
Arterial Pressure
Brain
Hypotension
Recovery
Induced Heart Arrest
Blood
Hypothermia
Facilitative Glucose Transport Proteins
Reperfusion Injury
Brain Ischemia

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Xu, K., Puchowicz, M., & LaManna, J. C. (2018). Post-resuscitation arterial blood pressure on survival and change of capillary density following cardiac arrest and resuscitation in rats. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (pp. 77-82). (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 1072). Springer New York LLC. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-91287-5_13

Post-resuscitation arterial blood pressure on survival and change of capillary density following cardiac arrest and resuscitation in rats. / Xu, Kui; Puchowicz, Michelle; LaManna, Joseph C.

Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer New York LLC, 2018. p. 77-82 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 1072).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Xu, K, Puchowicz, M & LaManna, JC 2018, Post-resuscitation arterial blood pressure on survival and change of capillary density following cardiac arrest and resuscitation in rats. in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 1072, Springer New York LLC, pp. 77-82. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-91287-5_13
Xu K, Puchowicz M, LaManna JC. Post-resuscitation arterial blood pressure on survival and change of capillary density following cardiac arrest and resuscitation in rats. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer New York LLC. 2018. p. 77-82. (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-91287-5_13
Xu, Kui ; Puchowicz, Michelle ; LaManna, Joseph C. / Post-resuscitation arterial blood pressure on survival and change of capillary density following cardiac arrest and resuscitation in rats. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer New York LLC, 2018. pp. 77-82 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology).
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