Postmortem Stability of Dopamine‐Sensitive Adenylate Cyclase, Guanylate Cyclase, ATPase, and GTPase in Rat Striatum

Susan E. Nicol, Susan Senogles, Thomas P. Caruso, James J. Hudziak, John D. McSwigan, William H. Frey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Abstract: The stability of dopamine‐sensitive adenylate cyclase, guanylate cyclase, ATPase, and GTPase was measured in homogenates of rat striatal tissue frozen from 0 to 24 h postmortem. ATPase, GTPase, and Mg2+‐dependent guanylate cyclase activities showed no significant change over this period. Mn2+‐dependent guanylate cyclase activity was stable for 10 h postmortem. Basal and dopamine‐stimulated adenylate cyclase activity decreased markedly during the first 5 h. However, when measured in washed membrane preparations, these adenylate cyclase activities remained stable for at least 10 h. Therefore, the postmortem loss of a soluble activator, such as GTP, may decrease the adenylate cyclase activity in homogenates. These results are not consistent with an earlier suggestion that there is a postmortem degradation of the enzyme itself. Other kinetic parameters of dopamine‐sensitive adenylate cyclase can also be measured independently of postmortem changes. Thus, it is possible to investigate kinetic parameters of dopamine‐sensitive adenylate cyclase, guanylate cyclase, ATPase, and GTPase in human brain obtained postmortem.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1535-1539
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neurochemistry
Volume37
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1981

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Guanylate Cyclase
GTP Phosphohydrolases
Adenylyl Cyclases
Adenosine Triphosphatases
Rats
Kinetic parameters
Postmortem Changes
Corpus Striatum
Ca(2+) Mg(2+)-ATPase
Guanosine Triphosphate
Brain
Tissue
Membranes
Degradation
Enzymes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Postmortem Stability of Dopamine‐Sensitive Adenylate Cyclase, Guanylate Cyclase, ATPase, and GTPase in Rat Striatum. / Nicol, Susan E.; Senogles, Susan; Caruso, Thomas P.; Hudziak, James J.; McSwigan, John D.; Frey, William H.

In: Journal of Neurochemistry, Vol. 37, No. 6, 01.01.1981, p. 1535-1539.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nicol, Susan E. ; Senogles, Susan ; Caruso, Thomas P. ; Hudziak, James J. ; McSwigan, John D. ; Frey, William H. / Postmortem Stability of Dopamine‐Sensitive Adenylate Cyclase, Guanylate Cyclase, ATPase, and GTPase in Rat Striatum. In: Journal of Neurochemistry. 1981 ; Vol. 37, No. 6. pp. 1535-1539.
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