Postnatal development of cat intestine

Changes in dimensions and nutrient transport

Randal Buddington, A. J. Lepine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Although ontogeny of the omnivore intestine is matched to shifts in dietary inputs, very little is known for carnivores. Therefore, we measured uptake of two sugars [galactose (GLC), glucose (GAL)], four amino acids [arginine (ARG), aspartate (ASP), proline (PRO), taurine (TAU)), and linoleic acid (LA) by proximal, mid, and distal small intestine, and octanoic acid (OA) by proximal colon from birth to adulthood using intact tissues from a multidisciplinary study of feline development. Colostrum does not stimulate intestinal growth during the first 24 h after birth, and up to the first 7 days. Increases between birth and adulthood in intestinal length, surface area, mucosal mass, and weight (3, 8, 12, and 28-fold) were lower than predicted from the 40-fold higher body mass, and much less than those of omnivores. Rates of uptake do not change during the first 24 h after birth. Sugar uptakes were 30% lower at 3 weeks and remained constant thereafter, with a possible change in transporter types. Between birth and adulthood rates of uptake declined 18, 30, and 54% for LA, PRO, and TAU, but remained constant for ARC and ASP. OA absorption peaked at 3 weeks. Compared to changes in metabolism (16-fold from body mass0.75), increases in total intestinal uptake capacities for LA, GLC, GAL and PRO (5, 7, 8, and 9-fold) were less, TAU (15-fold) comparable, and ARG and ASP (26 and 22-fold) excessive. Age-related changes in uptake by cat intestine are solute specific: match the shift from milk to a carnivorous diet, differ from those reported for omnivores, and provide insights about energy and nutrient requirements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalFASEB Journal
Volume11
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

nutrient transport
postnatal development
Taurine
Linoleic Acid
Proline
Nutrients
Intestines
Cats
intestines
Parturition
cats
Galactose
uptake mechanisms
Sugars
Food
taurine
omnivores
aspartic acid
adulthood
proline

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Postnatal development of cat intestine : Changes in dimensions and nutrient transport. / Buddington, Randal; Lepine, A. J.

In: FASEB Journal, Vol. 11, No. 3, 1997.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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