Postnatal development of nutrient transport in the intestine of dogs

Randal Buddington, Christiane Malo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To measure nutrient absorption by the intestine during postnatal development of dogs. Animals - 110 Beagles ranging from neonatal to adult dogs. Procedure - Rates of absorption for sugars (glucose, galactose, and fructose), amino acids (aspartate, leucine, lysine, methionine, and proline), a dipeptide (glycyl-sarcosine), and linoleic acid by the proximal, mid, and distal regions of the small intestine were measured as functions of age and concentration (kinetics) by use of intact tissues and brush-border membrane vesicles. Absorption of octanoic acid by the proximal portion of the colon was measured in intact tissues. Results - Rates of carrier-mediated transport by intact tissues decreased from birth to adulthood for aldohexoses and most amino acids but not for fructose and aspartate. Kinetics and characteristics of absorption suggest that there were changes in the densities, types, and proportions of various carriers for sugars and amino acids. Saturable absorption of linoleic acid in the small intestine and octanoic acid in the proximal portion of the colon increased after weaning. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Rates of absorption decreased between birth and adulthood for most nutrients. However, because of intestinal growth, absorption capacities of the entire small intestine remained constant for leucine and proline and increased for glucose, galactose, fructose, aspartate, and proline but were less than predicted from the increase in body weight. Although postnatal ontogeny of nutrient absorption was consistent with changes in the composition of the natural and commercial diets of growing dogs, rates of amino acid and peptide absorption were lower than expected.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)635-645
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume64
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

nutrient transport
postnatal development
Intestines
intestines
Dogs
Food
dogs
Fructose
fructose
Galactose
Proline
Aspartic Acid
aspartic acid
Small Intestine
Amino Acids
galactose
small intestine
proline
octanoic acid
amino acids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Postnatal development of nutrient transport in the intestine of dogs. / Buddington, Randal; Malo, Christiane.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 64, No. 5, 01.05.2003, p. 635-645.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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