Posttranscriptional regulation of the immediate-early gene EGR1 by light in the mouse retina

Perikles Simon, Klaus Schott, Robert Williams, Frank Schaeffel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Synaptic plasticity is modulated by differential regulation of transcription factors such as EGR1 which binds to DNA via a zinc finger binding domain. Inactivation of EGR1 has implicated this gene as a key regulator of memory formation and learning. However, it remains puzzling how synaptic input can lead to an up-regulation of the EGR-1 protein within only a few minutes. Here, we show by immunohistochemical staining that the EGR-1 protein is localized in synapses throughout the mouse retina. We demonstrate for the first time that two variants of Egr-1 mRNA are produced in the retina by alternative polyadenylation, with the longer version having an additional 293 base pairs at the end of the 3′UTR. Remarkably, the use of the alternative polyadenylation site is controlled by light. The additional 3′UTR sequence of the longer variant displays an even higher level of phylogenetic conservation than the coding region of this highly conserved gene. Additionally, it harbours a cytoplasmic polyadenylation element which is known to respond to NMDA receptor activation. The longer version of the Egr-1 mRNA could therefore rapidly respond to excitatory stimuli such as light or glutamate release whereas the short variant, which is predominantly expressed and contains the full coding sequence, lacks the regulatory elements for cytoplasmic polyadenylation in its 3′UTR.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3371-3377
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Neuroscience
Volume20
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2004

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Polyadenylation
Immediate-Early Genes
Retina
Light
Messenger RNA
Neuronal Plasticity
Zinc Fingers
N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors
Base Pairing
Synapses
Genes
Glutamic Acid
Proteins
Transcription Factors
Up-Regulation
Learning
Staining and Labeling
DNA

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Posttranscriptional regulation of the immediate-early gene EGR1 by light in the mouse retina. / Simon, Perikles; Schott, Klaus; Williams, Robert; Schaeffel, Frank.

In: European Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 20, No. 12, 12.2004, p. 3371-3377.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Simon, Perikles ; Schott, Klaus ; Williams, Robert ; Schaeffel, Frank. / Posttranscriptional regulation of the immediate-early gene EGR1 by light in the mouse retina. In: European Journal of Neuroscience. 2004 ; Vol. 20, No. 12. pp. 3371-3377.
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