Postural hypotension. Report of a case, with hemodynamic studies of central, peripheral and pulmonary artery pressures

Alan Solomon, Leslie A. Kuhn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A patient with diabetic neuropathy and associated orthostatic hypotension is described. Cardiac catheterization studies of central and peripheral arterial pressures during various degrees of tilting revealed abnormal findings in the recumbent position as well as during tilting. Whereas normally the peripheral arterial pressure exceeds the central arterial pressure, in this patient the central arterial pressure was slightly higher than the peripheral arterial pressure in the recumbent position. During tilting, the peripheral arterial pressure exceeded the central arterial pressure but the difference between the pressures was considerably less than would be evident in a normal person. These findings were taken as evidence that peripheral vascular "tone" was impaired in this patient in recumbency as well as during tilting. A simultaneously recorded pulmonary arterial pressure demonstrated a slight rise during tilting in contrast to the events in the systemic circulation, suggesting that there was no large initial fall in venous return. Pressor effects and relief of postural hypotension were obtained with Pitressin, administered intravenously, as well as with DOCA, administered intramuscularly. Sublingual administration of DOCA resulted in a prolonged remission.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)328-332
Number of pages5
JournalThe American Journal of Medicine
Volume28
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1 1960
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Orthostatic Hypotension
Pulmonary Artery
Arterial Pressure
Hemodynamics
Pressure
Desoxycorticosterone Acetate
Sublingual Administration
Diabetic Neuropathies
Cardiac Catheterization
Vasopressins
Blood Vessels
Lung

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Postural hypotension. Report of a case, with hemodynamic studies of central, peripheral and pulmonary artery pressures. / Solomon, Alan; Kuhn, Leslie A.

In: The American Journal of Medicine, Vol. 28, No. 2, 01.02.1960, p. 328-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1e572d01ec864e7dafa237507a5aa309,
title = "Postural hypotension. Report of a case, with hemodynamic studies of central, peripheral and pulmonary artery pressures",
abstract = "A patient with diabetic neuropathy and associated orthostatic hypotension is described. Cardiac catheterization studies of central and peripheral arterial pressures during various degrees of tilting revealed abnormal findings in the recumbent position as well as during tilting. Whereas normally the peripheral arterial pressure exceeds the central arterial pressure, in this patient the central arterial pressure was slightly higher than the peripheral arterial pressure in the recumbent position. During tilting, the peripheral arterial pressure exceeded the central arterial pressure but the difference between the pressures was considerably less than would be evident in a normal person. These findings were taken as evidence that peripheral vascular {"}tone{"} was impaired in this patient in recumbency as well as during tilting. A simultaneously recorded pulmonary arterial pressure demonstrated a slight rise during tilting in contrast to the events in the systemic circulation, suggesting that there was no large initial fall in venous return. Pressor effects and relief of postural hypotension were obtained with Pitressin, administered intravenously, as well as with DOCA, administered intramuscularly. Sublingual administration of DOCA resulted in a prolonged remission.",
author = "Alan Solomon and Kuhn, {Leslie A.}",
year = "1960",
month = "2",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "28",
pages = "328--332",
journal = "American Journal of Medicine",
issn = "0002-9343",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Postural hypotension. Report of a case, with hemodynamic studies of central, peripheral and pulmonary artery pressures

AU - Solomon, Alan

AU - Kuhn, Leslie A.

PY - 1960/2/1

Y1 - 1960/2/1

N2 - A patient with diabetic neuropathy and associated orthostatic hypotension is described. Cardiac catheterization studies of central and peripheral arterial pressures during various degrees of tilting revealed abnormal findings in the recumbent position as well as during tilting. Whereas normally the peripheral arterial pressure exceeds the central arterial pressure, in this patient the central arterial pressure was slightly higher than the peripheral arterial pressure in the recumbent position. During tilting, the peripheral arterial pressure exceeded the central arterial pressure but the difference between the pressures was considerably less than would be evident in a normal person. These findings were taken as evidence that peripheral vascular "tone" was impaired in this patient in recumbency as well as during tilting. A simultaneously recorded pulmonary arterial pressure demonstrated a slight rise during tilting in contrast to the events in the systemic circulation, suggesting that there was no large initial fall in venous return. Pressor effects and relief of postural hypotension were obtained with Pitressin, administered intravenously, as well as with DOCA, administered intramuscularly. Sublingual administration of DOCA resulted in a prolonged remission.

AB - A patient with diabetic neuropathy and associated orthostatic hypotension is described. Cardiac catheterization studies of central and peripheral arterial pressures during various degrees of tilting revealed abnormal findings in the recumbent position as well as during tilting. Whereas normally the peripheral arterial pressure exceeds the central arterial pressure, in this patient the central arterial pressure was slightly higher than the peripheral arterial pressure in the recumbent position. During tilting, the peripheral arterial pressure exceeded the central arterial pressure but the difference between the pressures was considerably less than would be evident in a normal person. These findings were taken as evidence that peripheral vascular "tone" was impaired in this patient in recumbency as well as during tilting. A simultaneously recorded pulmonary arterial pressure demonstrated a slight rise during tilting in contrast to the events in the systemic circulation, suggesting that there was no large initial fall in venous return. Pressor effects and relief of postural hypotension were obtained with Pitressin, administered intravenously, as well as with DOCA, administered intramuscularly. Sublingual administration of DOCA resulted in a prolonged remission.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=50549161567&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=50549161567&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 28

SP - 328

EP - 332

JO - American Journal of Medicine

JF - American Journal of Medicine

SN - 0002-9343

IS - 2

ER -