Potentially useful outcome measures for clinical research in pediatric neurosurgery

Paul Klimo, John R.W. Kestle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The choice of outcome (or outcomes) and their measurement are critical for a sound clinical trial. Surgeons have traditionally measured simple outcomes such as death, duration of survival, or tumor recurrence but have recently developed more sophisticated measures of the effect of an intervention. Many outcome measures require a lengthy maturation process, which includes a determination of the instrument's validity, reliability, and sensitivity; thus, using established instruments rather than creating new ones is recommended. The authors illustrate several guidelines for the determination of appropriate outcome measures by using examples from their experience and describe several outcome measures that can be used in pediatric neurosurgery. These include general outcome measures such as the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory and the Functional Independence Measure for Children, which measure physical function and independence in chronically ill and disabled children as well as disease-specific measures for hydrocephalus (Hydrocephalus Outcome Questionnaire), cerebral palsy (gross motor function and performance measures), head injury (Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category and Children's Coma Scale), and oncology (Pediatric Cancer Quality-of-Life Inventory).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-212
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume103 PEDIATRICS
Issue numberSUPPL. 3
StatePublished - Sep 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Neurosurgery
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pediatrics
Hydrocephalus
Research
Disability Evaluation
Equipment and Supplies
Disabled Children
Cerebral Palsy
Coma
Craniocerebral Trauma
Reproducibility of Results
Neoplasms
Chronic Disease
Quality of Life
Clinical Trials
Guidelines
Recurrence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Potentially useful outcome measures for clinical research in pediatric neurosurgery. / Klimo, Paul; Kestle, John R.W.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 103 PEDIATRICS, No. SUPPL. 3, 01.09.2005, p. 207-212.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klimo, Paul ; Kestle, John R.W. / Potentially useful outcome measures for clinical research in pediatric neurosurgery. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 2005 ; Vol. 103 PEDIATRICS, No. SUPPL. 3. pp. 207-212.
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