Predicting cardiovascular risk using measures of regional and total body fat

Richard Ricciardi, E. Metter, Erica W. Cavanaugh, Anna Ghambaryan, Laura Talbot

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Excessive body fat is associated with increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). Various anthropometric methods are currently used to quantify regional and total body fat. The objectives of this study were to provide more insight into differences in cutoff points between methods for measuring total body fat and those for measuring regional body fat, independently and in combination, and to determine how well anthropometric and bioelectrical impedance methods of estimating body composition predict cardiovascular risk in a sample of unfit National Guard soldiers. Unfit healthy men (n = 123) and women (n = 32) between 21 and 55 years old from the Army National Guard were assessed for total and regional body fat. After having their degree of total and regional body fat assessed, the participants were categorized by level of body fat and 10-year CHD risk. Comparisons and predictions were made between degree of total as well as regional body fat and 10-year CHD risk estimated from Framingham Heart Study equations. A significant positive relationship was observed between waist circumference and 10-year CHD risk in men. When controlling for age, waist circumference was predictive of 10-year CHD risk, contributing to 6.4% of the variance, whereas waist-to-hip ratio did not contribute to the model significantly. The results of this study show that waist circumference is the best measure for identifying unfit male individuals at risk for CHD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2-9
Number of pages8
JournalApplied Nursing Research
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2009

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Adipose Tissue
Coronary Disease
Waist Circumference
Waist-Hip Ratio
Military Personnel
Body Composition
Electric Impedance

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Predicting cardiovascular risk using measures of regional and total body fat. / Ricciardi, Richard; Metter, E.; Cavanaugh, Erica W.; Ghambaryan, Anna; Talbot, Laura.

In: Applied Nursing Research, Vol. 22, No. 1, 01.02.2009, p. 2-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ricciardi, Richard ; Metter, E. ; Cavanaugh, Erica W. ; Ghambaryan, Anna ; Talbot, Laura. / Predicting cardiovascular risk using measures of regional and total body fat. In: Applied Nursing Research. 2009 ; Vol. 22, No. 1. pp. 2-9.
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