Predicting mortality in low-birth-weight infants with pulmonary interstitial emphysema

Mark Gaylord, R. E. Thieme, D. L. Woodall, B. J. Quissell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Due to the high mortality associated with pulmonary interstitial emphysema in the low-birth-weight infant, a method was developed to predict the infants most at risk for death. This information will allow the discriminant selection of patients for future trials of an alternative method of mechanical ventilat ion, high-frequency ventilation. During a 3-year-period (July 1, 1979 through June 30, 1982), 70 infants were retrospectively analyzed to determine the clinical parameters important in predicting mortality. The infants at highest risk for death included those of younger gestational age, those with birth weight less than 1,500 g (95% of all mortalities), and those that developed pulmonary interstitial emphysema within the first 24 hours of life. Mortality sharply increased in the infants with birth weight less than 1,500 g whose ventilatory requirements exceeded a peak inspiratory pressure of 25 cm H2O on day 1. Morbidity was high in the survivors as evidenced by a 54% incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. With multivariant analysis, it was possible to isolate the variables (birth weight and highest peak inspiratory pressure on day 1) most influential in predicting mortality and to construct a formula for predicting mortality in the infants with birth weight less than 1,500 g. With a subsequent prospective study of 30 infants, the predictive accuracy of the formula was established.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-224
Number of pages6
JournalPediatrics
Volume76
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1985
Externally publishedYes

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Pulmonary Emphysema
Low Birth Weight Infant
Birth Weight
Mortality
High-Frequency Ventilation
Pressure
Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia
Infant Mortality
Patient Selection
Gestational Age
Survivors
Prospective Studies
Ions
Morbidity
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Gaylord, M., Thieme, R. E., Woodall, D. L., & Quissell, B. J. (1985). Predicting mortality in low-birth-weight infants with pulmonary interstitial emphysema. Pediatrics, 76(2), 219-224.

Predicting mortality in low-birth-weight infants with pulmonary interstitial emphysema. / Gaylord, Mark; Thieme, R. E.; Woodall, D. L.; Quissell, B. J.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 76, No. 2, 01.01.1985, p. 219-224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gaylord, M, Thieme, RE, Woodall, DL & Quissell, BJ 1985, 'Predicting mortality in low-birth-weight infants with pulmonary interstitial emphysema', Pediatrics, vol. 76, no. 2, pp. 219-224.
Gaylord, Mark ; Thieme, R. E. ; Woodall, D. L. ; Quissell, B. J. / Predicting mortality in low-birth-weight infants with pulmonary interstitial emphysema. In: Pediatrics. 1985 ; Vol. 76, No. 2. pp. 219-224.
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