Predictive factors of invasion in eyes with retinoblastoma enucleated after eye salvage treatments

Julia Balaguer, Matthew Wilson, Catherine A. Billups, John Mancini, Barrett G. Haik, Ibrahim Qaddoumi, Joseph D. Khoury, Carlos Rodriguez-Galindo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background. The impact of chemotherapy, focal therapies, radiation and co-existing ocular morbidities on histology of eyes with retinoblastoma enucleated following chemoreduction is not well known. Procedure. Twenty-five eyes (23 patients) with retinoblastoma enucleated after failing eye-salvage therapy were evaluated. Reasons for enucleation (tumor progression, subretinal or vitreous seeds) and co-morbid conditions (neovascular glaucoma, cataract, vitreous hemorrhage and retinal detachment) were documented. All specimens were reviewed for evidence of ciliary body, choroidal, optic nerve, and scleral invasion. Results. The median age at diagnosis was 14 months (range, 1-37 months). Twenty eyes were classified as Reese-Ellsworth Group IV-V at diagnosis. Twenty-four eyes had recurrent disease at enucleation; one eye was enucleated for neovascular glaucoma and vitreous hemorrhage. Co-existing ocular morbidities at enucleation included vitreous hemorrhage (n = 6), retinal detachment (n = 9), neovascular glaucoma (n = 9) and cataracts (n = 3). Histologic findings included choroidal invasion (n = 7), ciliary body invasion (n = 4), optic nerve invasion (n=6) and scleral invasion (n=3). The median time from diagnosis to enucleation was 11 months. Co-existing retinal detachment and vitreous hemorrhage significantly increased the likelihood of optic nerve invasion (P= 0.014 and P= 0.011, respectively). Prolonged time to enucleation was significantly associated with the likelihood of choroidal (P = 0.010) and ciliary body (P = 0.021) invasion as well as invasion of multiple sites. Conclusion. In eyes with retinoblastoma enucleated after chemoreduction, co-existing ocular morbidities and time to enucleation are predictive of extra-retinal extension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-356
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Blood and Cancer
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2009

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Salvage Therapy
Retinoblastoma
Vitreous Hemorrhage
Neovascular Glaucoma
Ciliary Body
Retinal Detachment
Optic Nerve
Morbidity
Cataract
Vitreous Detachment
Retinal Hemorrhage
Seeds
Histology
Radiotherapy
Drug Therapy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Hematology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Balaguer, J., Wilson, M., Billups, C. A., Mancini, J., Haik, B. G., Qaddoumi, I., ... Rodriguez-Galindo, C. (2009). Predictive factors of invasion in eyes with retinoblastoma enucleated after eye salvage treatments. Pediatric Blood and Cancer, 52(3), 351-356. https://doi.org/10.1002/pbc.21845

Predictive factors of invasion in eyes with retinoblastoma enucleated after eye salvage treatments. / Balaguer, Julia; Wilson, Matthew; Billups, Catherine A.; Mancini, John; Haik, Barrett G.; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Khoury, Joseph D.; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos.

In: Pediatric Blood and Cancer, Vol. 52, No. 3, 01.03.2009, p. 351-356.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Balaguer, J, Wilson, M, Billups, CA, Mancini, J, Haik, BG, Qaddoumi, I, Khoury, JD & Rodriguez-Galindo, C 2009, 'Predictive factors of invasion in eyes with retinoblastoma enucleated after eye salvage treatments', Pediatric Blood and Cancer, vol. 52, no. 3, pp. 351-356. https://doi.org/10.1002/pbc.21845
Balaguer, Julia ; Wilson, Matthew ; Billups, Catherine A. ; Mancini, John ; Haik, Barrett G. ; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim ; Khoury, Joseph D. ; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos. / Predictive factors of invasion in eyes with retinoblastoma enucleated after eye salvage treatments. In: Pediatric Blood and Cancer. 2009 ; Vol. 52, No. 3. pp. 351-356.
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abstract = "Background. The impact of chemotherapy, focal therapies, radiation and co-existing ocular morbidities on histology of eyes with retinoblastoma enucleated following chemoreduction is not well known. Procedure. Twenty-five eyes (23 patients) with retinoblastoma enucleated after failing eye-salvage therapy were evaluated. Reasons for enucleation (tumor progression, subretinal or vitreous seeds) and co-morbid conditions (neovascular glaucoma, cataract, vitreous hemorrhage and retinal detachment) were documented. All specimens were reviewed for evidence of ciliary body, choroidal, optic nerve, and scleral invasion. Results. The median age at diagnosis was 14 months (range, 1-37 months). Twenty eyes were classified as Reese-Ellsworth Group IV-V at diagnosis. Twenty-four eyes had recurrent disease at enucleation; one eye was enucleated for neovascular glaucoma and vitreous hemorrhage. Co-existing ocular morbidities at enucleation included vitreous hemorrhage (n = 6), retinal detachment (n = 9), neovascular glaucoma (n = 9) and cataracts (n = 3). Histologic findings included choroidal invasion (n = 7), ciliary body invasion (n = 4), optic nerve invasion (n=6) and scleral invasion (n=3). The median time from diagnosis to enucleation was 11 months. Co-existing retinal detachment and vitreous hemorrhage significantly increased the likelihood of optic nerve invasion (P= 0.014 and P= 0.011, respectively). Prolonged time to enucleation was significantly associated with the likelihood of choroidal (P = 0.010) and ciliary body (P = 0.021) invasion as well as invasion of multiple sites. Conclusion. In eyes with retinoblastoma enucleated after chemoreduction, co-existing ocular morbidities and time to enucleation are predictive of extra-retinal extension.",
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AU - Qaddoumi, Ibrahim

AU - Khoury, Joseph D.

AU - Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos

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N2 - Background. The impact of chemotherapy, focal therapies, radiation and co-existing ocular morbidities on histology of eyes with retinoblastoma enucleated following chemoreduction is not well known. Procedure. Twenty-five eyes (23 patients) with retinoblastoma enucleated after failing eye-salvage therapy were evaluated. Reasons for enucleation (tumor progression, subretinal or vitreous seeds) and co-morbid conditions (neovascular glaucoma, cataract, vitreous hemorrhage and retinal detachment) were documented. All specimens were reviewed for evidence of ciliary body, choroidal, optic nerve, and scleral invasion. Results. The median age at diagnosis was 14 months (range, 1-37 months). Twenty eyes were classified as Reese-Ellsworth Group IV-V at diagnosis. Twenty-four eyes had recurrent disease at enucleation; one eye was enucleated for neovascular glaucoma and vitreous hemorrhage. Co-existing ocular morbidities at enucleation included vitreous hemorrhage (n = 6), retinal detachment (n = 9), neovascular glaucoma (n = 9) and cataracts (n = 3). Histologic findings included choroidal invasion (n = 7), ciliary body invasion (n = 4), optic nerve invasion (n=6) and scleral invasion (n=3). The median time from diagnosis to enucleation was 11 months. Co-existing retinal detachment and vitreous hemorrhage significantly increased the likelihood of optic nerve invasion (P= 0.014 and P= 0.011, respectively). Prolonged time to enucleation was significantly associated with the likelihood of choroidal (P = 0.010) and ciliary body (P = 0.021) invasion as well as invasion of multiple sites. Conclusion. In eyes with retinoblastoma enucleated after chemoreduction, co-existing ocular morbidities and time to enucleation are predictive of extra-retinal extension.

AB - Background. The impact of chemotherapy, focal therapies, radiation and co-existing ocular morbidities on histology of eyes with retinoblastoma enucleated following chemoreduction is not well known. Procedure. Twenty-five eyes (23 patients) with retinoblastoma enucleated after failing eye-salvage therapy were evaluated. Reasons for enucleation (tumor progression, subretinal or vitreous seeds) and co-morbid conditions (neovascular glaucoma, cataract, vitreous hemorrhage and retinal detachment) were documented. All specimens were reviewed for evidence of ciliary body, choroidal, optic nerve, and scleral invasion. Results. The median age at diagnosis was 14 months (range, 1-37 months). Twenty eyes were classified as Reese-Ellsworth Group IV-V at diagnosis. Twenty-four eyes had recurrent disease at enucleation; one eye was enucleated for neovascular glaucoma and vitreous hemorrhage. Co-existing ocular morbidities at enucleation included vitreous hemorrhage (n = 6), retinal detachment (n = 9), neovascular glaucoma (n = 9) and cataracts (n = 3). Histologic findings included choroidal invasion (n = 7), ciliary body invasion (n = 4), optic nerve invasion (n=6) and scleral invasion (n=3). The median time from diagnosis to enucleation was 11 months. Co-existing retinal detachment and vitreous hemorrhage significantly increased the likelihood of optic nerve invasion (P= 0.014 and P= 0.011, respectively). Prolonged time to enucleation was significantly associated with the likelihood of choroidal (P = 0.010) and ciliary body (P = 0.021) invasion as well as invasion of multiple sites. Conclusion. In eyes with retinoblastoma enucleated after chemoreduction, co-existing ocular morbidities and time to enucleation are predictive of extra-retinal extension.

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