Predictors of Left Ventricular Dilatation in Young Adults (from the Bogalusa Heart Study)

Showkat Haji, Rifat Eralp Ulusoy, Dharmendrakumar A. Patel, Sathanur R. Srinivasan, Wei Chen, Patrice Delafontaine, Gerald S. Berenson

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Abstract

Left ventricular (LV) dilatation may be an early sign of cardiac decompensation progressing to LV dysfunction. Determinants of LV dilatation in young asymptomatic adults are unknown. Five hundred six asymptomatic subjects (mean age 32 ± 3 years) enrolled in the Bogalusa Heart Study underwent echocardiographic examination. LV dilatation (LV end-diastolic diameter >5.5 cm) as measured by M-mode echocardiography was found in 31 subjects (6%). Subjects with LV dilatation had greater body mass indexes (32 ± 9 vs 27 ± 6 kg/m2, p <0.0001), systolic (119 ± 15 vs 112 ± 12 mm Hg, p = 0.007) and diastolic (79 ± 12 vs 75 ± 9 mm Hg, p = 0.04) blood pressures, and LV mass (230 ± 50 vs 123 ± 39 g, p <0.0001). Age, gender, race, and metabolic parameters (glucose, insulin, and lipoprotein levels) did not differ significantly between the subjects with and without LV dilatation. After correction for age, gender, and race differences, adulthood obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m2) was associated with a threefold odds ratio (2.9, 95% confidence interval 1.4 to 6.1), and hypertension (defined as per the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure) was also associated with a threefold odds ratio (3.0, 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 7.1) for an increased incidence of LV dilatation. There was an incremental increase in LV end-diastolic dimension depending on the presence of hypertension or obesity, and subjects with obesity and hypertension in adulthood had the greatest degree of LV end-diastolic dimensions. In multiple regression analyses, body mass index in childhood was the only significant predictor of LV dilatation in adulthood (odds ratio 1.47, 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 2.09). In conclusion, obesity beginning in childhood and obesity and hypertension in young adulthood are predictors of LV dilatation in an otherwise healthy young adult population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1234-1237
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume98
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2006

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Dilatation
Young Adult
Hypertension
Pediatric Obesity
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Body Mass Index
Obesity
Left Ventricular Dysfunction
Echocardiography
Regression Analysis
Incidence
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Haji, S., Ulusoy, R. E., Patel, D. A., Srinivasan, S. R., Chen, W., Delafontaine, P., & Berenson, G. S. (2006). Predictors of Left Ventricular Dilatation in Young Adults (from the Bogalusa Heart Study). American Journal of Cardiology, 98(9), 1234-1237. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2006.05.054

Predictors of Left Ventricular Dilatation in Young Adults (from the Bogalusa Heart Study). / Haji, Showkat; Ulusoy, Rifat Eralp; Patel, Dharmendrakumar A.; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Chen, Wei; Delafontaine, Patrice; Berenson, Gerald S.

In: American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 98, No. 9, 01.11.2006, p. 1234-1237.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Haji, S, Ulusoy, RE, Patel, DA, Srinivasan, SR, Chen, W, Delafontaine, P & Berenson, GS 2006, 'Predictors of Left Ventricular Dilatation in Young Adults (from the Bogalusa Heart Study)', American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 98, no. 9, pp. 1234-1237. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2006.05.054
Haji, Showkat ; Ulusoy, Rifat Eralp ; Patel, Dharmendrakumar A. ; Srinivasan, Sathanur R. ; Chen, Wei ; Delafontaine, Patrice ; Berenson, Gerald S. / Predictors of Left Ventricular Dilatation in Young Adults (from the Bogalusa Heart Study). In: American Journal of Cardiology. 2006 ; Vol. 98, No. 9. pp. 1234-1237.
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abstract = "Left ventricular (LV) dilatation may be an early sign of cardiac decompensation progressing to LV dysfunction. Determinants of LV dilatation in young asymptomatic adults are unknown. Five hundred six asymptomatic subjects (mean age 32 ± 3 years) enrolled in the Bogalusa Heart Study underwent echocardiographic examination. LV dilatation (LV end-diastolic diameter >5.5 cm) as measured by M-mode echocardiography was found in 31 subjects (6{\%}). Subjects with LV dilatation had greater body mass indexes (32 ± 9 vs 27 ± 6 kg/m2, p <0.0001), systolic (119 ± 15 vs 112 ± 12 mm Hg, p = 0.007) and diastolic (79 ± 12 vs 75 ± 9 mm Hg, p = 0.04) blood pressures, and LV mass (230 ± 50 vs 123 ± 39 g, p <0.0001). Age, gender, race, and metabolic parameters (glucose, insulin, and lipoprotein levels) did not differ significantly between the subjects with and without LV dilatation. After correction for age, gender, and race differences, adulthood obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m2) was associated with a threefold odds ratio (2.9, 95{\%} confidence interval 1.4 to 6.1), and hypertension (defined as per the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure) was also associated with a threefold odds ratio (3.0, 95{\%} confidence interval 1.2 to 7.1) for an increased incidence of LV dilatation. There was an incremental increase in LV end-diastolic dimension depending on the presence of hypertension or obesity, and subjects with obesity and hypertension in adulthood had the greatest degree of LV end-diastolic dimensions. In multiple regression analyses, body mass index in childhood was the only significant predictor of LV dilatation in adulthood (odds ratio 1.47, 95{\%} confidence interval 1.03 to 2.09). In conclusion, obesity beginning in childhood and obesity and hypertension in young adulthood are predictors of LV dilatation in an otherwise healthy young adult population.",
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