Predictors of stage of adoption for colorectal cancer screening among african american primary care patients

Hsiao Lan Wang, Shannon Christy, Celette S. Skinner, Victoria L. Champion, Jeffrey K. Springston, Susan M. Perkins, Yan Tong, Connie Krier, Netsanet Gebregziabher, Susan M. Rawl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND:: Compared with other racial groups, African Americans have the highest colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality rates coupled with lower screening rates. OBJECTIVE:: Our study examined the predictors of stage of adoption for fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and colonoscopy among African American primary care patients who were nonadherent to published screening guidelines. METHODS:: Baseline data (N = 815) in a randomized clinical trial were analyzed. Participants were categorized into precontemplation, contemplation, and preparation stages for FOBT and colonoscopy. Predictor variables were demographics, clinical variables, CRC health beliefs and knowledge, and social support. Hierarchical modeling was to identify significant predictors of stage of adoption. RESULTS:: Older, male, Veterans Affairs participants and those with higher perceived self-efficacy, family/friend encouragement, and a provider recommendation had higher odds of being at a more advanced stage of adoption for FOBT. Patients with a history of cancer and higher perceived barriers had higher odds of being at an earlier stage of adoption for FOBT. Predictors of more advanced stage of adoption for colonoscopy included higher perceived benefits, higher perceived self-efficacy, family/friend encouragement, and a provider recommendation for colonoscopy. Higher income (>30 000 vs <15 000) was predictive of earlier stage of adoption for colonoscopy. CONCLUSIONS:: Enhancing self-efficacy, encouragement from family and friends, and provider recommendations are important components of interventions to promote CRC screening. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE:: Nurses can use knowledge of the characteristics associated with stage of adoption to educate and motivate their African American primary care patients to complete CRC screening tests.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)241-251
Number of pages11
JournalCancer Nursing
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Colonoscopy
Occult Blood
Early Detection of Cancer
African Americans
Colorectal Neoplasms
Primary Health Care
Self Efficacy
Veterans
Social Support
Randomized Controlled Trials
Nurses
Demography
Guidelines
Mortality
Incidence
Health
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Oncology(nursing)

Cite this

Wang, H. L., Christy, S., Skinner, C. S., Champion, V. L., Springston, J. K., Perkins, S. M., ... Rawl, S. M. (2014). Predictors of stage of adoption for colorectal cancer screening among african american primary care patients. Cancer Nursing, 37(4), 241-251. https://doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0b013e3182a40d8d

Predictors of stage of adoption for colorectal cancer screening among african american primary care patients. / Wang, Hsiao Lan; Christy, Shannon; Skinner, Celette S.; Champion, Victoria L.; Springston, Jeffrey K.; Perkins, Susan M.; Tong, Yan; Krier, Connie; Gebregziabher, Netsanet; Rawl, Susan M.

In: Cancer Nursing, Vol. 37, No. 4, 01.01.2014, p. 241-251.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, HL, Christy, S, Skinner, CS, Champion, VL, Springston, JK, Perkins, SM, Tong, Y, Krier, C, Gebregziabher, N & Rawl, SM 2014, 'Predictors of stage of adoption for colorectal cancer screening among african american primary care patients', Cancer Nursing, vol. 37, no. 4, pp. 241-251. https://doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0b013e3182a40d8d
Wang, Hsiao Lan ; Christy, Shannon ; Skinner, Celette S. ; Champion, Victoria L. ; Springston, Jeffrey K. ; Perkins, Susan M. ; Tong, Yan ; Krier, Connie ; Gebregziabher, Netsanet ; Rawl, Susan M. / Predictors of stage of adoption for colorectal cancer screening among african american primary care patients. In: Cancer Nursing. 2014 ; Vol. 37, No. 4. pp. 241-251.
@article{eb727874a497461f9d85bc1d0eaa6494,
title = "Predictors of stage of adoption for colorectal cancer screening among african american primary care patients",
abstract = "BACKGROUND:: Compared with other racial groups, African Americans have the highest colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality rates coupled with lower screening rates. OBJECTIVE:: Our study examined the predictors of stage of adoption for fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and colonoscopy among African American primary care patients who were nonadherent to published screening guidelines. METHODS:: Baseline data (N = 815) in a randomized clinical trial were analyzed. Participants were categorized into precontemplation, contemplation, and preparation stages for FOBT and colonoscopy. Predictor variables were demographics, clinical variables, CRC health beliefs and knowledge, and social support. Hierarchical modeling was to identify significant predictors of stage of adoption. RESULTS:: Older, male, Veterans Affairs participants and those with higher perceived self-efficacy, family/friend encouragement, and a provider recommendation had higher odds of being at a more advanced stage of adoption for FOBT. Patients with a history of cancer and higher perceived barriers had higher odds of being at an earlier stage of adoption for FOBT. Predictors of more advanced stage of adoption for colonoscopy included higher perceived benefits, higher perceived self-efficacy, family/friend encouragement, and a provider recommendation for colonoscopy. Higher income (>30 000 vs <15 000) was predictive of earlier stage of adoption for colonoscopy. CONCLUSIONS:: Enhancing self-efficacy, encouragement from family and friends, and provider recommendations are important components of interventions to promote CRC screening. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE:: Nurses can use knowledge of the characteristics associated with stage of adoption to educate and motivate their African American primary care patients to complete CRC screening tests.",
author = "Wang, {Hsiao Lan} and Shannon Christy and Skinner, {Celette S.} and Champion, {Victoria L.} and Springston, {Jeffrey K.} and Perkins, {Susan M.} and Yan Tong and Connie Krier and Netsanet Gebregziabher and Rawl, {Susan M.}",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/NCC.0b013e3182a40d8d",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "241--251",
journal = "Cancer Nursing",
issn = "0162-220X",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predictors of stage of adoption for colorectal cancer screening among african american primary care patients

AU - Wang, Hsiao Lan

AU - Christy, Shannon

AU - Skinner, Celette S.

AU - Champion, Victoria L.

AU - Springston, Jeffrey K.

AU - Perkins, Susan M.

AU - Tong, Yan

AU - Krier, Connie

AU - Gebregziabher, Netsanet

AU - Rawl, Susan M.

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - BACKGROUND:: Compared with other racial groups, African Americans have the highest colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality rates coupled with lower screening rates. OBJECTIVE:: Our study examined the predictors of stage of adoption for fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and colonoscopy among African American primary care patients who were nonadherent to published screening guidelines. METHODS:: Baseline data (N = 815) in a randomized clinical trial were analyzed. Participants were categorized into precontemplation, contemplation, and preparation stages for FOBT and colonoscopy. Predictor variables were demographics, clinical variables, CRC health beliefs and knowledge, and social support. Hierarchical modeling was to identify significant predictors of stage of adoption. RESULTS:: Older, male, Veterans Affairs participants and those with higher perceived self-efficacy, family/friend encouragement, and a provider recommendation had higher odds of being at a more advanced stage of adoption for FOBT. Patients with a history of cancer and higher perceived barriers had higher odds of being at an earlier stage of adoption for FOBT. Predictors of more advanced stage of adoption for colonoscopy included higher perceived benefits, higher perceived self-efficacy, family/friend encouragement, and a provider recommendation for colonoscopy. Higher income (>30 000 vs <15 000) was predictive of earlier stage of adoption for colonoscopy. CONCLUSIONS:: Enhancing self-efficacy, encouragement from family and friends, and provider recommendations are important components of interventions to promote CRC screening. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE:: Nurses can use knowledge of the characteristics associated with stage of adoption to educate and motivate their African American primary care patients to complete CRC screening tests.

AB - BACKGROUND:: Compared with other racial groups, African Americans have the highest colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality rates coupled with lower screening rates. OBJECTIVE:: Our study examined the predictors of stage of adoption for fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and colonoscopy among African American primary care patients who were nonadherent to published screening guidelines. METHODS:: Baseline data (N = 815) in a randomized clinical trial were analyzed. Participants were categorized into precontemplation, contemplation, and preparation stages for FOBT and colonoscopy. Predictor variables were demographics, clinical variables, CRC health beliefs and knowledge, and social support. Hierarchical modeling was to identify significant predictors of stage of adoption. RESULTS:: Older, male, Veterans Affairs participants and those with higher perceived self-efficacy, family/friend encouragement, and a provider recommendation had higher odds of being at a more advanced stage of adoption for FOBT. Patients with a history of cancer and higher perceived barriers had higher odds of being at an earlier stage of adoption for FOBT. Predictors of more advanced stage of adoption for colonoscopy included higher perceived benefits, higher perceived self-efficacy, family/friend encouragement, and a provider recommendation for colonoscopy. Higher income (>30 000 vs <15 000) was predictive of earlier stage of adoption for colonoscopy. CONCLUSIONS:: Enhancing self-efficacy, encouragement from family and friends, and provider recommendations are important components of interventions to promote CRC screening. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE:: Nurses can use knowledge of the characteristics associated with stage of adoption to educate and motivate their African American primary care patients to complete CRC screening tests.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84902651364&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84902651364&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/NCC.0b013e3182a40d8d

DO - 10.1097/NCC.0b013e3182a40d8d

M3 - Article

VL - 37

SP - 241

EP - 251

JO - Cancer Nursing

JF - Cancer Nursing

SN - 0162-220X

IS - 4

ER -