Predisposing factors associated with colonization or infection with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia at a University Hospital

Phillip Rogers, N. J. Dorman, J. E. Humphries, J. D. Cleary, R. L. Nolan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for patients colonized or infected with S. maltophilia. Methods: Charts of patients and from whom S. maltophilia was isolated and two matched controls were prospectively reviewed. Data collected included demographics, length of stay, underlying disease, prior antibiotics and immunosuppressive therapy, site of infection, susceptibilities, and severity of illness. Representative isolates underwent molecular typing by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Results: Data for fifty-five case patients (26 female, 29 male) and eighty-four control patients (46 female, 38 male) have been collected over a 14-month period. The mean age was 43 years and 36 years and the mean length of hospital stay was 34 days and 7 days (P < 0.05) for case and control patients, respectively. Patients were distributed across all hospital wards and medical services. The mean number of antibiotic days and length of stay prior to isolation of S. maltophilia was 11 and 14 days respectively. Patients had a higher risk of S. matophilia acquisition if they had a hematologic malignancy, had received H-2 antagonists, had a tracheotomy, central line, broviac catheter, foley catheter, or were mechanically ventilated, or had received prior antibiotic therapy (P < 0.05). Sites of isolation included blood (5.5%), respiratory (64%), wound (9%), urine (4%), CNS (2%), and other (20%). Forty-one patients (75%) were infected. The same number were nosocomially acquired. Sixteen case patients and no control patients died prior to discharge. Molecular typing of 25 of 40 available isolates showed only two to be identical. Conclusion: At our institution, risk factors for colonization or infection with S. maltophilia are multifold. Many of these risk factors might be surrogates for residence in an intensive care unit. Data collection is in progress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Investigative Medicine
Volume47
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Stenotrophomonas maltophilia
Causality
Catheters
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Infection
Length of Stay
Intensive care units
Immunosuppressive Agents
Molecular Typing
Electrophoresis
Blood
Gels
Tracheotomy
Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis
Hematologic Neoplasms
Intensive Care Units
Demography
Urine

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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Predisposing factors associated with colonization or infection with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia at a University Hospital. / Rogers, Phillip; Dorman, N. J.; Humphries, J. E.; Cleary, J. D.; Nolan, R. L.

In: Journal of Investigative Medicine, Vol. 47, No. 2, 01.01.1999.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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