Pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism

Emily M. Armstrong, Jessica M. Bellone, Lori B. Hornsby, Sarah Eudaley, Haley M. Phillippe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), with a reported incidence ranging from 0.49 to 2 events per 1000 deliveries. Risk factors include advanced maternal age, obesity, smoking, and cesarian section. Women with a history of previous VTE are at a 4-fold higher risk of recurrent thromboembolic events during subsequent pregnancies. Additionally, the presence of concomitant thrombophilia, particularly factor V Leiden (homozygosity), prothrombin gene mutation (homozygosity), or antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), increases the risk of pregnancy-related VTE. Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and unfractionated heparin (UFH) are the drugs of choice for anticoagulation during pregnancy. LMWH is preferred due to ease of use and lower rates of adverse events. Women with high thromboembolic risk particularly those with a family history of VTE should receive antepartum thromboprophylaxis. Women with low thromboembolic risk or previous VTE caused by a transient risk factor (ie, provoked), who have no family history of VTE, may undergo antepartum surveillance. Postpartum anticoagulation can be considered in women with both high and low thromboembolic risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)243-252
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Pharmacy Practice
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Venous Thromboembolism
Pregnancy
Low Molecular Weight Heparin
Antiphospholipid Syndrome
Maternal Age
Prothrombin
Cesarean Section
Postpartum Period
Heparin
Obesity
Smoking
Mutation
Incidence
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Genes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Armstrong, E. M., Bellone, J. M., Hornsby, L. B., Eudaley, S., & Phillippe, H. M. (2014). Pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism. Journal of Pharmacy Practice, 27(3), 243-252. https://doi.org/10.1177/0897190014530425

Pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism. / Armstrong, Emily M.; Bellone, Jessica M.; Hornsby, Lori B.; Eudaley, Sarah; Phillippe, Haley M.

In: Journal of Pharmacy Practice, Vol. 27, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 243-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Armstrong, EM, Bellone, JM, Hornsby, LB, Eudaley, S & Phillippe, HM 2014, 'Pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism', Journal of Pharmacy Practice, vol. 27, no. 3, pp. 243-252. https://doi.org/10.1177/0897190014530425
Armstrong EM, Bellone JM, Hornsby LB, Eudaley S, Phillippe HM. Pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism. Journal of Pharmacy Practice. 2014 Jan 1;27(3):243-252. https://doi.org/10.1177/0897190014530425
Armstrong, Emily M. ; Bellone, Jessica M. ; Hornsby, Lori B. ; Eudaley, Sarah ; Phillippe, Haley M. / Pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism. In: Journal of Pharmacy Practice. 2014 ; Vol. 27, No. 3. pp. 243-252.
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