Preliminary experience with airway pressure release ventilation in a trauma/surgical intensive care unit

Benjamin W. Dart IV, Robert Maxwell, Charles M. Richart, Donald K. Brooks, David L. Ciraulo, Donald E. Barker, R. Phillip Burns

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Airway pressure-release ventilation (APRV) is a pressure-limited, time-cycled mode of mechanical ventilation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate our initial experience with the use of APRV in acutely injured, ventilated patients. Methods: Since March 2003, APRV has been used selectively in adult trauma patients with or at risk for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. Data were obtained before and during the 72 hours after switching to APRV. A retrospective analysis of these data was then performed. Results: Complete data were available on 46 of 60 patients (77%) for the first 72 hours of APRV. Before APRV, the average PaO 2/FIO2 ratio was 243 and the average peak airway pressure was 28 cm H2O. Peak airway pressure decreased 19% (p = 0.001), PaO2/FIO2 improved by 23% (p = 0.017) and release tidal volumes improved by 13% (p = 0.020) over the course of the analysis. Conclusion: APRV significantly improved oxygenation by alveolar recruitment and allowed for a reduction in peak airway pressures. This relatively new modality had favorable results and appears to be an effective alternative for lung recruitment in traumatically injured patients at risk for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-76
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume59
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Continuous Positive Airway Pressure
Critical Care
Intensive Care Units
Wounds and Injuries
Pressure
Acute Lung Injury
Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Tidal Volume
Artificial Respiration
Lung

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Preliminary experience with airway pressure release ventilation in a trauma/surgical intensive care unit. / Dart IV, Benjamin W.; Maxwell, Robert; Richart, Charles M.; Brooks, Donald K.; Ciraulo, David L.; Barker, Donald E.; Burns, R. Phillip.

In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 59, No. 1, 01.01.2005, p. 71-76.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dart IV, Benjamin W. ; Maxwell, Robert ; Richart, Charles M. ; Brooks, Donald K. ; Ciraulo, David L. ; Barker, Donald E. ; Burns, R. Phillip. / Preliminary experience with airway pressure release ventilation in a trauma/surgical intensive care unit. In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care. 2005 ; Vol. 59, No. 1. pp. 71-76.
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