Prenatal vitamin D levels and child wheeze and asthma

Sarah N. Adams, Margaret A. Adgent, Tebeb Gebretsadik, Terryl J. Hartman, Shanda Vereen, Christina Ortiz, Frances Tylavsky, Kecia N. Carroll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Maternal vitamin D status during pregnancy may influence lung development and risk of childhood wheeze and asthma. We investigated the relationship between prenatal vitamin D and child asthma in a racially diverse cohort with a high burden of vitamin D insufficiency and child asthma. Materials and methods: We included mother–child dyads in the prenatal Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood (CANDLE) cohort (2006–2011, Shelby County, Tennessee). Maternal plasma vitamin D [25(OH)D] was measured from second trimester (n = 1091) and delivery specimens (n = 907). At age 4–6 years, we obtained parent report of current child wheeze (symptoms within the past 12 months) and asthma (physician diagnosis and/or medication or symptoms within the past 12 months). We used multivariable logistic regression to assess associations of 25(OH)D and child wheeze/asthma, including an interaction term for maternal race. Results: Median second trimester 25(OH)D levels were 25.1 and 19.1 ng/ml in White (n = 366) and Black women (N = 725), respectively. We detected significant interactions by maternal race for second-trimester plasma 25(OH)D and child current wheeze (p =.014) and asthma (p =.011). Odds of current wheeze and asthma decreased with increasing 25(OH)D in dyads with White mothers and increased in dyads with Black mothers, e.g. adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for asthma: 0.63 (0.36–1.09) and 1.41 (1.01–1.97) per interquartile range (15–27 ng/ml 25[OH]D) increase, respectively. At delivery, protective associations in White dyads were attenuated. Conclusion: We detected effect modification by maternal race in associations between prenatal 25(OH)D and child wheeze/asthma. Further research in racially diverse populations is needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Vitamin D
Asthma
Mothers
Second Pregnancy Trimester
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Learning
Confidence Intervals
Physicians
Pregnancy
Lung
Research
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Adams, S. N., Adgent, M. A., Gebretsadik, T., Hartman, T. J., Vereen, S., Ortiz, C., ... Carroll, K. N. (2019). Prenatal vitamin D levels and child wheeze and asthma. Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine. https://doi.org/10.1080/14767058.2019.1607286

Prenatal vitamin D levels and child wheeze and asthma. / Adams, Sarah N.; Adgent, Margaret A.; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Hartman, Terryl J.; Vereen, Shanda; Ortiz, Christina; Tylavsky, Frances; Carroll, Kecia N.

In: Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Adams, Sarah N. ; Adgent, Margaret A. ; Gebretsadik, Tebeb ; Hartman, Terryl J. ; Vereen, Shanda ; Ortiz, Christina ; Tylavsky, Frances ; Carroll, Kecia N. / Prenatal vitamin D levels and child wheeze and asthma. In: Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine. 2019.
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AU - Adams, Sarah N.

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AU - Gebretsadik, Tebeb

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AU - Vereen, Shanda

AU - Ortiz, Christina

AU - Tylavsky, Frances

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