Preparing for the new world order

Interdisciplinary model for training primary care teams

Linda Nichols, Mary S. Huller, Gloria Morris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Health care and continuing education are at an important change point. With the increasing competitiveness, efficiency, and customer service orientation of the health care environment, health care delivery and organizational structures are rapidly changing. In order to prepare providers for this environment, continuing education programs must mirror and prepare for organizational, functional, and role changes. To meet these challenges, we developed a program to train primary care teams. The program was based on needs identified by client facilities, incorporated information on changes in the health care environment and business continuous quality improvement tools innovations, and used adult learning principles, including collaboration, respect, informality, reciprocity, and grouping learners according to interests. The program model focused on scientific content, work tasks, and team process. Components of the program included information on national health care changes, clarification of roles and responsibilities, individual and team assessment, Continuous Quality Improvement Tools, statistical tools, communication, conflict management, consensus building, and action planning. A total of 46 facilities and 180 participants attended one of four different sessions, which included follow‐up at 3 and 6 months post conferences. Teams were evaluated using a standard satisfaction index (conference), the Team Review Questionnaire (6 months post conference), and action plan progress (3 and 6 months post conferences). The model of this program reflects our belief that information alone is not enough to effect change. For continuing education to remain relevant, the content of programs must match the changing needs of health care providers and their institutions and the process of instruction must fit and model these new models and behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-188
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

Fingerprint

world order
Primary Health Care
Continuing Education
Delivery of Health Care
health care
Quality Improvement
functional change
Health Education
role change
Health Personnel
education
Consensus
conflict management
action plan
Communication
organizational change
Learning
reciprocity
organizational structure
grouping

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

Preparing for the new world order : Interdisciplinary model for training primary care teams. / Nichols, Linda; Huller, Mary S.; Morris, Gloria.

In: Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, Vol. 15, No. 3, 01.01.1995, p. 181-188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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