Present imperfect: A critical review of animal models of the mnemonic impairments in Alzheimer's disease

Michael Mcdonald, J. Bruce Overmier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper reviews the current literature on animal models of the memory impairments of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The authors suggest that modeling of the mnemonic deficits in AD be limited to the amnesia observed early in the course of the disease, to eliminate the influence of impairments in non- mnemonic processes. Tasks should be chosen for their specificity and selectivity to the behavioral phenomena observed in early-stage AD and not for their relevance to hypothetical mnemonic processes. Tasks that manipulate the delay between learning and remembering are better able to differentiate Alzheimer patients from persons with other disorders, and better able to differentiate effects of manipulations in animals. The most commonly used manipulations that attempt to model the amnesia of AD are reviewed within these constraints. The authors conclude that of the models examined, lesions of the medial septal nucleus produce behavioral deficits that are most similar to the mnemonic impairments in the earliest stage of AD. However, the parallel is not definitive and more work is needed to clarify the relationship between neurobiology and behavior in AD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-120
Number of pages22
JournalNeuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 27 1997

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Alzheimer Disease
Animal Models
Amnesia
Septal Nuclei
Neurobiology
Memory Disorders
Learning

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Present imperfect : A critical review of animal models of the mnemonic impairments in Alzheimer's disease. / Mcdonald, Michael; Overmier, J. Bruce.

In: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, Vol. 22, No. 1, 27.12.1997, p. 99-120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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