Presenting Symptoms among Black and White Women with Provoked Vulvodynia

Candace Brown, Davis C. Foster, Candi C. Bachour, Leslie A. Rawlinson, Jim Wan, Gloria Ann Bachmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The prevalence of vulvodynia has been reported to be lower in black compared to white and Latina women. Use of different terminology to describe vulvar pain symptoms may play a role in lower prevalence. The objectives were to compare pain descriptors used by black and white women with provoked vulvodynia (PVD) to determine the effect of race on symptom reporting. Methods: Ninety-two women, self-identified as black (n=55) and white (n=37) with clinically confirmed PVD completed a questionnaire containing demographic information and vulvar pain characteristics. Variables that were significant with race retained in the logistic regression model were included in multivariate analysis to determine the effect of race on reporting of vulvar pain symptoms. Results: Of statistical significance, white women more often described their pain as burning as compared with black women (84% vs. 22%, p≤0.0001). White women more frequently reported their pain as stinging (51% vs. 29%, p=0.03) and itching (32% vs. 15%, p=0.04) as well, whereas there was a trend for black women to more often describe their pain as aching (67% vs. 49%, p=0.07). Overall, white women were 19 times as likely to report their pain as burning (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 18.51, 99% confidence interval [CI] 4.46-76.86). Conclusions: These data suggest that black women are less likely to self-report their vulvar pain as burning, the classic symptom of PVD. Cultural influences and different underlying pain mechanisms may contribute to differences in symptom reporting by race.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)831-836
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Women's Health
Volume24
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

Fingerprint

Vulvodynia
Pain
Logistic Models
hydroquinone
Pruritus
Hispanic Americans
Terminology
Self Report

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Presenting Symptoms among Black and White Women with Provoked Vulvodynia. / Brown, Candace; Foster, Davis C.; Bachour, Candi C.; Rawlinson, Leslie A.; Wan, Jim; Bachmann, Gloria Ann.

In: Journal of Women's Health, Vol. 24, No. 10, 01.10.2015, p. 831-836.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, Candace ; Foster, Davis C. ; Bachour, Candi C. ; Rawlinson, Leslie A. ; Wan, Jim ; Bachmann, Gloria Ann. / Presenting Symptoms among Black and White Women with Provoked Vulvodynia. In: Journal of Women's Health. 2015 ; Vol. 24, No. 10. pp. 831-836.
@article{3a7d866097de46deaf8dc581188f0a00,
title = "Presenting Symptoms among Black and White Women with Provoked Vulvodynia",
abstract = "Background: The prevalence of vulvodynia has been reported to be lower in black compared to white and Latina women. Use of different terminology to describe vulvar pain symptoms may play a role in lower prevalence. The objectives were to compare pain descriptors used by black and white women with provoked vulvodynia (PVD) to determine the effect of race on symptom reporting. Methods: Ninety-two women, self-identified as black (n=55) and white (n=37) with clinically confirmed PVD completed a questionnaire containing demographic information and vulvar pain characteristics. Variables that were significant with race retained in the logistic regression model were included in multivariate analysis to determine the effect of race on reporting of vulvar pain symptoms. Results: Of statistical significance, white women more often described their pain as burning as compared with black women (84{\%} vs. 22{\%}, p≤0.0001). White women more frequently reported their pain as stinging (51{\%} vs. 29{\%}, p=0.03) and itching (32{\%} vs. 15{\%}, p=0.04) as well, whereas there was a trend for black women to more often describe their pain as aching (67{\%} vs. 49{\%}, p=0.07). Overall, white women were 19 times as likely to report their pain as burning (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 18.51, 99{\%} confidence interval [CI] 4.46-76.86). Conclusions: These data suggest that black women are less likely to self-report their vulvar pain as burning, the classic symptom of PVD. Cultural influences and different underlying pain mechanisms may contribute to differences in symptom reporting by race.",
author = "Candace Brown and Foster, {Davis C.} and Bachour, {Candi C.} and Rawlinson, {Leslie A.} and Jim Wan and Bachmann, {Gloria Ann}",
year = "2015",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/jwh.2014.5164",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "24",
pages = "831--836",
journal = "Journal of Women's Health",
issn = "1540-9996",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Presenting Symptoms among Black and White Women with Provoked Vulvodynia

AU - Brown, Candace

AU - Foster, Davis C.

AU - Bachour, Candi C.

AU - Rawlinson, Leslie A.

AU - Wan, Jim

AU - Bachmann, Gloria Ann

PY - 2015/10/1

Y1 - 2015/10/1

N2 - Background: The prevalence of vulvodynia has been reported to be lower in black compared to white and Latina women. Use of different terminology to describe vulvar pain symptoms may play a role in lower prevalence. The objectives were to compare pain descriptors used by black and white women with provoked vulvodynia (PVD) to determine the effect of race on symptom reporting. Methods: Ninety-two women, self-identified as black (n=55) and white (n=37) with clinically confirmed PVD completed a questionnaire containing demographic information and vulvar pain characteristics. Variables that were significant with race retained in the logistic regression model were included in multivariate analysis to determine the effect of race on reporting of vulvar pain symptoms. Results: Of statistical significance, white women more often described their pain as burning as compared with black women (84% vs. 22%, p≤0.0001). White women more frequently reported their pain as stinging (51% vs. 29%, p=0.03) and itching (32% vs. 15%, p=0.04) as well, whereas there was a trend for black women to more often describe their pain as aching (67% vs. 49%, p=0.07). Overall, white women were 19 times as likely to report their pain as burning (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 18.51, 99% confidence interval [CI] 4.46-76.86). Conclusions: These data suggest that black women are less likely to self-report their vulvar pain as burning, the classic symptom of PVD. Cultural influences and different underlying pain mechanisms may contribute to differences in symptom reporting by race.

AB - Background: The prevalence of vulvodynia has been reported to be lower in black compared to white and Latina women. Use of different terminology to describe vulvar pain symptoms may play a role in lower prevalence. The objectives were to compare pain descriptors used by black and white women with provoked vulvodynia (PVD) to determine the effect of race on symptom reporting. Methods: Ninety-two women, self-identified as black (n=55) and white (n=37) with clinically confirmed PVD completed a questionnaire containing demographic information and vulvar pain characteristics. Variables that were significant with race retained in the logistic regression model were included in multivariate analysis to determine the effect of race on reporting of vulvar pain symptoms. Results: Of statistical significance, white women more often described their pain as burning as compared with black women (84% vs. 22%, p≤0.0001). White women more frequently reported their pain as stinging (51% vs. 29%, p=0.03) and itching (32% vs. 15%, p=0.04) as well, whereas there was a trend for black women to more often describe their pain as aching (67% vs. 49%, p=0.07). Overall, white women were 19 times as likely to report their pain as burning (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 18.51, 99% confidence interval [CI] 4.46-76.86). Conclusions: These data suggest that black women are less likely to self-report their vulvar pain as burning, the classic symptom of PVD. Cultural influences and different underlying pain mechanisms may contribute to differences in symptom reporting by race.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84945578715&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84945578715&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/jwh.2014.5164

DO - 10.1089/jwh.2014.5164

M3 - Article

VL - 24

SP - 831

EP - 836

JO - Journal of Women's Health

JF - Journal of Women's Health

SN - 1540-9996

IS - 10

ER -