Pretransplant warm b cell antibodies in recipients of primary and retransplanted cadaver renal allografts

Marc P. Posner, T. Mohanakumar, Cecil L. Rhodes, Margaret B. McGeorge, Gerardo Mendez-Picon, Mitchell Goldman, Hyung M. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Eighty-four recipients of cadaveric renal allografts were retrospectively crossmatched for donor-specific pretransplant B cell antibody. Of these, 28 were found to be positive for the antibody and 56 were negative. Actuarial survival analysis over six years revealed a slightly better graft survival overall in the B-cell-negative group as compared with the B-cell-positive group (P<0.07).These patients were further subgrouped into those who received primary transplants and those who were retransplanted. Fifty-four percent of the B-cell-positive group (15/28) consisted of retransplants, and only 13= (7/56) of the B-cell-negative group were retransplants. When considering primary transplants only, B-cell-negative and B-cell-positive groups had similar graft survival rates (P<0.25). When retransplants only were considered, the graft survivals of the B-cell-positive and B-cell-negative groups were comparable (P<0.32). The most significant differences were observed when comparing the B-cell-positive primary transplant group with the B-cell-positive retransplanted group. The primary transplants fared consistently better at all time intervals (P<.007). Conversely, when primary and retransplants in the B-cell-negative group were compared, no differences were noted (P<0.29). Our results suggest that the identification of pretransplant B-cell antibodies may be indicative of a poorer allograft survival prognosis in patients who have been previously transplanted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)638-642
Number of pages5
JournalTransplantation
Volume38
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

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Cadaver
Allografts
B-Lymphocytes
Kidney
Antibodies
Graft Survival
Transplants
Actuarial Analysis
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Tissue Donors

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Transplantation

Cite this

Posner, M. P., Mohanakumar, T., Rhodes, C. L., McGeorge, M. B., Mendez-Picon, G., Goldman, M., & Lee, H. M. (1984). Pretransplant warm b cell antibodies in recipients of primary and retransplanted cadaver renal allografts. Transplantation, 38(6), 638-642. https://doi.org/10.1097/00007890-198412000-00018

Pretransplant warm b cell antibodies in recipients of primary and retransplanted cadaver renal allografts. / Posner, Marc P.; Mohanakumar, T.; Rhodes, Cecil L.; McGeorge, Margaret B.; Mendez-Picon, Gerardo; Goldman, Mitchell; Lee, Hyung M.

In: Transplantation, Vol. 38, No. 6, 01.01.1984, p. 638-642.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Posner, MP, Mohanakumar, T, Rhodes, CL, McGeorge, MB, Mendez-Picon, G, Goldman, M & Lee, HM 1984, 'Pretransplant warm b cell antibodies in recipients of primary and retransplanted cadaver renal allografts', Transplantation, vol. 38, no. 6, pp. 638-642. https://doi.org/10.1097/00007890-198412000-00018
Posner, Marc P. ; Mohanakumar, T. ; Rhodes, Cecil L. ; McGeorge, Margaret B. ; Mendez-Picon, Gerardo ; Goldman, Mitchell ; Lee, Hyung M. / Pretransplant warm b cell antibodies in recipients of primary and retransplanted cadaver renal allografts. In: Transplantation. 1984 ; Vol. 38, No. 6. pp. 638-642.
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