Preventing emergency department visits and hospitalizations for asthma by use of oral corticosteroids at home

Are we adhering to national guidelines

Timothy H. Self, Cary R. Chrisman, Anna R. Jacobs, Ngan H. Vo, John C. Winton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Oral corticosteroids (OCS) in the home management of asthma exacerbations have been recommended in the NIHNHLBI guidelines since 1991. As a routine component of written action plans, OCS treatment at home is associated with reduced emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations as well as decreased mortality. Methods: A literature search of English language journals from 1991 to 2009 was performed using several databases, including PubMed, EMBASE, and SCOPUS. We assessed studies that evaluated adherence to national guidelines for home management of asthma exacerbations. Results: Our review of the literature found that several studies reveal that a small percentage (<3-26) of patients are receiving OCS at home to manage asthma exacerbations prior to an ED visit. Additional studies were found showing very low use of written action plans, strongly suggesting lack of OCS for home management of asthma exacerbations. Conclusions: Despite evidence of reduced ED visits and hospitalizations and the recommendations of national and international guidelines, the home use of OCS in managing asthma exacerbations remains unacceptably low. New strategies are needed to ensure home use of OCS as part of written action plans to prevent ED visits and hospitalizations for asthma exacerbations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1123-1127
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Asthma
Volume47
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

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Hospital Emergency Service
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Hospitalization
Asthma
Guidelines
PubMed
Language
Databases
Mortality
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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Preventing emergency department visits and hospitalizations for asthma by use of oral corticosteroids at home : Are we adhering to national guidelines. / Self, Timothy H.; Chrisman, Cary R.; Jacobs, Anna R.; Vo, Ngan H.; Winton, John C.

In: Journal of Asthma, Vol. 47, No. 10, 01.12.2010, p. 1123-1127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Self, Timothy H. ; Chrisman, Cary R. ; Jacobs, Anna R. ; Vo, Ngan H. ; Winton, John C. / Preventing emergency department visits and hospitalizations for asthma by use of oral corticosteroids at home : Are we adhering to national guidelines. In: Journal of Asthma. 2010 ; Vol. 47, No. 10. pp. 1123-1127.
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