Primary graft infections

William H. Edwards, Raymond S. Martin, Judith M. Jenkins, William Edwards, Joseph L. Mulherin

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    101 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    An amputation rate of 8% to 52% and a mortality rate of 13% to 58% make vascular prosthetic graft infections the most dreaded complication facing a vascular surgeon. In 1978 a randomized prospective double-blind study reported a statistically significant decrease in wound infections in patients treated with prophylactic antibiotics whereas the graft infection difference only approached statistical significance. The present study reviews 2614 arterial prosthetic grafts implanted from January 1975 through June 1986. Twenty-four patients were identified as having a prosthetic graft infection, yielding an overall infection rate of 0.92%. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common organism, occurring in one third of the cases. The most common graft material was polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) (33%) followed by Dacron (29%), composite PTFE and Dacron (20%), and umbilical vein grafts (9%). Diabetes was a common factor in one third of the patients. Symptoms of infection were present in 15 patients (63%) within 3 months of operation, with 11 patients showing symptoms within 30 days. The longest interval between operation and onset of symptoms was 48 months. Prophylactic antibiotics were administered to 22 of the 24 patients, but in only 7 of the 22 (29.5%) were they given according to our usual practice. All patients required removal of the infected prosthesis, with limb loss in 17% and death in 17%.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)235-239
    Number of pages5
    JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
    Volume6
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 1987

    Fingerprint

    Transplants
    Infection
    Polyethylene Terephthalates
    Polytetrafluoroethylene
    Blood Vessels
    Artificial Limbs
    Anti-Bacterial Agents
    Umbilical Veins
    Wound Infection
    Amputation
    Double-Blind Method
    Staphylococcus aureus
    Mortality

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Surgery
    • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

    Cite this

    Edwards, W. H., Martin, R. S., Jenkins, J. M., Edwards, W., & Mulherin, J. L. (1987). Primary graft infections. Journal of Vascular Surgery, 6(3), 235-239. https://doi.org/10.1016/0741-5214(87)90034-6

    Primary graft infections. / Edwards, William H.; Martin, Raymond S.; Jenkins, Judith M.; Edwards, William; Mulherin, Joseph L.

    In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 6, No. 3, 01.01.1987, p. 235-239.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Edwards, WH, Martin, RS, Jenkins, JM, Edwards, W & Mulherin, JL 1987, 'Primary graft infections', Journal of Vascular Surgery, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 235-239. https://doi.org/10.1016/0741-5214(87)90034-6
    Edwards WH, Martin RS, Jenkins JM, Edwards W, Mulherin JL. Primary graft infections. Journal of Vascular Surgery. 1987 Jan 1;6(3):235-239. https://doi.org/10.1016/0741-5214(87)90034-6
    Edwards, William H. ; Martin, Raymond S. ; Jenkins, Judith M. ; Edwards, William ; Mulherin, Joseph L. / Primary graft infections. In: Journal of Vascular Surgery. 1987 ; Vol. 6, No. 3. pp. 235-239.
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