Primary prevention of type 2 diabetes: An imperative for developing countries

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The global prevalence of diabetes currently exceeds 400 million and is projected to increase to more than 600 million affected persons by the year 2035. Developing countries will account for the greater proportion of the projected increase in diabetes prevalence. Indeed, if current trends remain unabated, people with diabetes in developing countries will comprise >70 % of the global diabetes burden by the year 2035. Diabetes is now the leading cause of blindness, end-stage renal failure, nontraumatic limb amputations, heart disease, and stroke. These expensive complications inflict a major drain on the economies of even upper-income countries; indeed, most developing countries lack the resources for tackling the challenges of diabetes care delivery and effective management of its complications. There is now abundant evidence that type 2 diabetes (which accounts for greater than 90 % of diabetes worldwide) can be prevented: the challenge is how best to translate the results of clinical trials globally to communities with disparate resources and capabilities. This chapter makes the compelling case for primary prevention of diabetes as an imperative for developing countries and discusses how that can be accomplished, including the novel concept Community Diabetes Prevention Centers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationDiabetes Mellitus in Developing Countries and Underserved Communities
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages7-31
Number of pages25
ISBN (Electronic)9783319415598
ISBN (Print)9783319415574
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Primary Prevention
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Developing Countries
Blindness
Amputation
Chronic Kidney Failure
Heart Diseases
Extremities
Stroke
Clinical Trials

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Dagogo-Jack, S. (2016). Primary prevention of type 2 diabetes: An imperative for developing countries. In Diabetes Mellitus in Developing Countries and Underserved Communities (pp. 7-31). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-41559-8_2

Primary prevention of type 2 diabetes : An imperative for developing countries. / Dagogo-Jack, Samuel.

Diabetes Mellitus in Developing Countries and Underserved Communities. Springer International Publishing, 2016. p. 7-31.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Dagogo-Jack, S 2016, Primary prevention of type 2 diabetes: An imperative for developing countries. in Diabetes Mellitus in Developing Countries and Underserved Communities. Springer International Publishing, pp. 7-31. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-41559-8_2
Dagogo-Jack S. Primary prevention of type 2 diabetes: An imperative for developing countries. In Diabetes Mellitus in Developing Countries and Underserved Communities. Springer International Publishing. 2016. p. 7-31 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-41559-8_2
Dagogo-Jack, Samuel. / Primary prevention of type 2 diabetes : An imperative for developing countries. Diabetes Mellitus in Developing Countries and Underserved Communities. Springer International Publishing, 2016. pp. 7-31
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