Primary repair of colon wounds

A prospective trial in nonselected patients

S. M. George, T. C. Fabian, G. R. Voeller, K. A. Kudsk, E. C. Mangiante, L. G. Britt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

145 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

102 patients with penetrating intraperitoneal colon injuries were entered into a prospective study. Colon wound management was undertaken without regard to associated injuries or amount of fecal contamination. Primary repair was performed in 83 patients, segmental resection with anastomosis in 12, and resection with end colostomy in 7. There were no suture line failures in the primary repair group, and one suture line failure in the anastomosis group. The one failure was in a patient who underwent repeated explorations for bleeding before the leak occurred. The septic complication rate was 33% of the entire series and was unrelated to primary repair. Logistic regression analysis to identify risk factors for sepsis included transfusion ≥ 4 units (p < 0.02), more than two associated injuries (p < 0.04), significant contamination (p < 0.05), and increasing colon injury severity scores (p < 0.02). The method of colon wound management, location and mode of injury, presence of hypotension (BP < 90), and age did not significantly contribute to sepsis. We conclude that nearly all penetrating colon wounds can be repaired primarily or with resection and anastomosis, regardless of risk factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)728-736
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Surgery
Volume209
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1989

Fingerprint

Colon
Wounds and Injuries
Sutures
Sepsis
Penetrating Wounds
Injury Severity Score
Colostomy
Hypotension
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Prospective Studies
Hemorrhage

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

George, S. M., Fabian, T. C., Voeller, G. R., Kudsk, K. A., Mangiante, E. C., & Britt, L. G. (1989). Primary repair of colon wounds: A prospective trial in nonselected patients. Annals of Surgery, 209(6), 728-736.

Primary repair of colon wounds : A prospective trial in nonselected patients. / George, S. M.; Fabian, T. C.; Voeller, G. R.; Kudsk, K. A.; Mangiante, E. C.; Britt, L. G.

In: Annals of Surgery, Vol. 209, No. 6, 1989, p. 728-736.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

George, SM, Fabian, TC, Voeller, GR, Kudsk, KA, Mangiante, EC & Britt, LG 1989, 'Primary repair of colon wounds: A prospective trial in nonselected patients', Annals of Surgery, vol. 209, no. 6, pp. 728-736.
George SM, Fabian TC, Voeller GR, Kudsk KA, Mangiante EC, Britt LG. Primary repair of colon wounds: A prospective trial in nonselected patients. Annals of Surgery. 1989;209(6):728-736.
George, S. M. ; Fabian, T. C. ; Voeller, G. R. ; Kudsk, K. A. ; Mangiante, E. C. ; Britt, L. G. / Primary repair of colon wounds : A prospective trial in nonselected patients. In: Annals of Surgery. 1989 ; Vol. 209, No. 6. pp. 728-736.
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