Production and immunodiagnostic applications of antihuman light chain monoclonal antibodies

M. Abe, T. Goto, Stephen Kennel, D. Wolfenbarger, S. D. Macy, D. T. Weiss, Alan Solomon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hybridomas producing antihuman light chain monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) were derived from fusion of SP2/O mouse myeloma cells with splenic lymphocytes from mice repeatedly immunized with purified κ- and λ-type Bence Jones proteins representative of the major V(κ) (V(κI), V(κII), V(κIII), V(κIV)) and V(λ) (V(λI), V(λII/V), V(λIII), V(λIV), V(λVI)) subgroups or gene families. Monoclonal antibodies were obtained that had specificity for constant-region (C(L)) determinants common to all κ or λ light chains (C(κ) and C(λ), respectively) as well as for variable-region (V(L)) epitopes unique to each of the V(κ) or V(λ) subgroups. The capability of these reagents to recognize C(L) and V(L) determinants on monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) molecules was demonstrated in fluid-phase antigen-capturing enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), solid-phase ELISA, and immunoblotting. In addition, these antilight chain MoAbs were used to establish immunocytochemically the κ or λ type and V(L)-subgroup nature of light chains expressed by the cytoplasmic Ig of monoclonal plasma cell and surface Ig of B-lymphocyte populations, respectively. These antibodies facilitated the immunohistochemical detection and characterization of light- chain-associated amyloid (AL amyloid) and other types of light-chain-related tissue deposits. Furthermore, the anti-C(L)-specific MoAbs were used to measure serum and urinary Igκ and Igλ concentrations. Quantification of Bence Jones protein excretion, even in the presence of other urinary proteins, was possible using the highly sensitive anti-C(κ) and anti-C(λ) MoAbs reactive only with free light chains. The ability to identify and characterize, through the use of these antihuman light chain MoAbs, light- chain-related epitopes at the protein, cellular, and tissue level has clinical importance in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with monoclonal plasma cell and related B-cell immunoproliferative diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-74
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Pathology
Volume100
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

Fingerprint

Monoclonal Antibodies
Light
Immunoglobulins
Bence Jones Protein
Plasma Cells
Amyloid
Epitopes
B-Lymphocytes
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
B-Cell Antigen Receptors
Hybridomas
Immunoblotting
Proteins
Lymphocytes
Antigens
Antibodies
Serum
Population
Genes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Production and immunodiagnostic applications of antihuman light chain monoclonal antibodies. / Abe, M.; Goto, T.; Kennel, Stephen; Wolfenbarger, D.; Macy, S. D.; Weiss, D. T.; Solomon, Alan.

In: American Journal of Clinical Pathology, Vol. 100, No. 1, 01.01.1993, p. 67-74.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abe, M. ; Goto, T. ; Kennel, Stephen ; Wolfenbarger, D. ; Macy, S. D. ; Weiss, D. T. ; Solomon, Alan. / Production and immunodiagnostic applications of antihuman light chain monoclonal antibodies. In: American Journal of Clinical Pathology. 1993 ; Vol. 100, No. 1. pp. 67-74.
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