Prognostic Factors and Survival of Gliomatosis Cerebri

A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Marios K. Georgakis, Georgios Tsivgoulis, Dimitrios Spinos, Athanasios Liaskas, Ulrich Herrlinger, Eleni T. Petridou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Gliomatosis cerebri (GC) is a fatal diffusely infiltrating glioma. Because of its rarity, only scarce evidence is available regarding outcome predictors and the proper management of GC. Methods: Reported studies of patients with histologically confirmed GC were systematically reviewed and individual patient-level data (n = 523) extracted. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were fit for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Results: The median OS and PFS were 13 and 10 months, with 5-year rates of 18% and 13%, respectively. Age ≥65 years at diagnosis (hazard ratio for OS [HROS], 2.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.62–3.31), high-grade tumor (HRPFS for grade III, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.02–2.40; HRPFS for grade IV, 1.74; 95% CI, [0.98–3.10), GC type II (HROS, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.12–1.98; HRPFS, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.04–2.34), more central nervous system (CNS) regions involved (HROS, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.01–1.18), focal neurological deficits (HROS, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.07–1.86), cerebellar symptoms (HRPFS, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.42–3.39), more symptoms at presentation (HROS, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.05–1.40), Karnofsky performance scale score <70 (HROS, 3.58; 95% CI, 1.73–7.39; HRPFS, 4.48; 95% CI, 1.39–14.4), magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement (HROS, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.12–1.96; HRPFS, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.18–2.55), symmetric bilateral CNS invasion (HROS, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.03–1.96), and high proliferation index (Ki-67 >5%; HROS, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.11–4.86) were independent predictors of poor outcomes. In contrast, seizure occurrence (HROS, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.60–1.00; HRPFS, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.47–0.95), isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutation (HROS, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.05–0.49), and O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase promoter methylation (HROS, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.09–0.59) were associated with prolonged survival. Chemotherapy and surgical resection were associated with improved outcomes, but radiotherapy, whether monotherapy or combined with chemotherapy, was not superior to chemotherapy alone. Conclusions: In the largest study to date on GC, we have identified clinical, imaging, and molecular outcome predictors that are similar to other gliomas and highlight the beneficial effect of chemotherapy and surgical resection, when feasible, on outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e818-e854
JournalWorld Neurosurgery
Volume120
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

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Neuroepithelial Neoplasms
Meta-Analysis
Confidence Intervals
Survival
Drug Therapy
Glioma
Disease-Free Survival
Karnofsky Performance Status
Isocitrate Dehydrogenase
Molecular Imaging
Methyltransferases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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Prognostic Factors and Survival of Gliomatosis Cerebri : A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. / Georgakis, Marios K.; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Spinos, Dimitrios; Liaskas, Athanasios; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Petridou, Eleni T.

In: World Neurosurgery, Vol. 120, 01.12.2018, p. e818-e854.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Georgakis, Marios K. ; Tsivgoulis, Georgios ; Spinos, Dimitrios ; Liaskas, Athanasios ; Herrlinger, Ulrich ; Petridou, Eleni T. / Prognostic Factors and Survival of Gliomatosis Cerebri : A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. In: World Neurosurgery. 2018 ; Vol. 120. pp. e818-e854.
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abstract = "Background: Gliomatosis cerebri (GC) is a fatal diffusely infiltrating glioma. Because of its rarity, only scarce evidence is available regarding outcome predictors and the proper management of GC. Methods: Reported studies of patients with histologically confirmed GC were systematically reviewed and individual patient-level data (n = 523) extracted. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were fit for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Results: The median OS and PFS were 13 and 10 months, with 5-year rates of 18{\%} and 13{\%}, respectively. Age ≥65 years at diagnosis (hazard ratio for OS [HROS], 2.32; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.62–3.31), high-grade tumor (HRPFS for grade III, 1.57; 95{\%} CI, 1.02–2.40; HRPFS for grade IV, 1.74; 95{\%} CI, [0.98–3.10), GC type II (HROS, 1.49; 95{\%} CI, 1.12–1.98; HRPFS, 1.56; 95{\%} CI, 1.04–2.34), more central nervous system (CNS) regions involved (HROS, 1.09; 95{\%} CI, 1.01–1.18), focal neurological deficits (HROS, 1.41; 95{\%} CI, 1.07–1.86), cerebellar symptoms (HRPFS, 2.20; 95{\%} CI, 1.42–3.39), more symptoms at presentation (HROS, 1.21; 95{\%} CI, 1.05–1.40), Karnofsky performance scale score <70 (HROS, 3.58; 95{\%} CI, 1.73–7.39; HRPFS, 4.48; 95{\%} CI, 1.39–14.4), magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement (HROS, 1.48; 95{\%} CI, 1.12–1.96; HRPFS, 1.74; 95{\%} CI, 1.18–2.55), symmetric bilateral CNS invasion (HROS, 1.42; 95{\%} CI, 1.03–1.96), and high proliferation index (Ki-67 >5{\%}; HROS, 2.32; 95{\%} CI, 1.11–4.86) were independent predictors of poor outcomes. In contrast, seizure occurrence (HROS, 0.77; 95{\%} CI, 0.60–1.00; HRPFS, 0.68; 95{\%} CI, 0.47–0.95), isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutation (HROS, 0.16; 95{\%} CI, 0.05–0.49), and O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase promoter methylation (HROS, 0.23; 95{\%} CI, 0.09–0.59) were associated with prolonged survival. Chemotherapy and surgical resection were associated with improved outcomes, but radiotherapy, whether monotherapy or combined with chemotherapy, was not superior to chemotherapy alone. Conclusions: In the largest study to date on GC, we have identified clinical, imaging, and molecular outcome predictors that are similar to other gliomas and highlight the beneficial effect of chemotherapy and surgical resection, when feasible, on outcomes.",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Prognostic Factors and Survival of Gliomatosis Cerebri

T2 - A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

AU - Georgakis, Marios K.

AU - Tsivgoulis, Georgios

AU - Spinos, Dimitrios

AU - Liaskas, Athanasios

AU - Herrlinger, Ulrich

AU - Petridou, Eleni T.

PY - 2018/12/1

Y1 - 2018/12/1

N2 - Background: Gliomatosis cerebri (GC) is a fatal diffusely infiltrating glioma. Because of its rarity, only scarce evidence is available regarding outcome predictors and the proper management of GC. Methods: Reported studies of patients with histologically confirmed GC were systematically reviewed and individual patient-level data (n = 523) extracted. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were fit for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Results: The median OS and PFS were 13 and 10 months, with 5-year rates of 18% and 13%, respectively. Age ≥65 years at diagnosis (hazard ratio for OS [HROS], 2.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.62–3.31), high-grade tumor (HRPFS for grade III, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.02–2.40; HRPFS for grade IV, 1.74; 95% CI, [0.98–3.10), GC type II (HROS, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.12–1.98; HRPFS, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.04–2.34), more central nervous system (CNS) regions involved (HROS, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.01–1.18), focal neurological deficits (HROS, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.07–1.86), cerebellar symptoms (HRPFS, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.42–3.39), more symptoms at presentation (HROS, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.05–1.40), Karnofsky performance scale score <70 (HROS, 3.58; 95% CI, 1.73–7.39; HRPFS, 4.48; 95% CI, 1.39–14.4), magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement (HROS, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.12–1.96; HRPFS, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.18–2.55), symmetric bilateral CNS invasion (HROS, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.03–1.96), and high proliferation index (Ki-67 >5%; HROS, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.11–4.86) were independent predictors of poor outcomes. In contrast, seizure occurrence (HROS, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.60–1.00; HRPFS, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.47–0.95), isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutation (HROS, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.05–0.49), and O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase promoter methylation (HROS, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.09–0.59) were associated with prolonged survival. Chemotherapy and surgical resection were associated with improved outcomes, but radiotherapy, whether monotherapy or combined with chemotherapy, was not superior to chemotherapy alone. Conclusions: In the largest study to date on GC, we have identified clinical, imaging, and molecular outcome predictors that are similar to other gliomas and highlight the beneficial effect of chemotherapy and surgical resection, when feasible, on outcomes.

AB - Background: Gliomatosis cerebri (GC) is a fatal diffusely infiltrating glioma. Because of its rarity, only scarce evidence is available regarding outcome predictors and the proper management of GC. Methods: Reported studies of patients with histologically confirmed GC were systematically reviewed and individual patient-level data (n = 523) extracted. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were fit for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Results: The median OS and PFS were 13 and 10 months, with 5-year rates of 18% and 13%, respectively. Age ≥65 years at diagnosis (hazard ratio for OS [HROS], 2.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.62–3.31), high-grade tumor (HRPFS for grade III, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.02–2.40; HRPFS for grade IV, 1.74; 95% CI, [0.98–3.10), GC type II (HROS, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.12–1.98; HRPFS, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.04–2.34), more central nervous system (CNS) regions involved (HROS, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.01–1.18), focal neurological deficits (HROS, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.07–1.86), cerebellar symptoms (HRPFS, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.42–3.39), more symptoms at presentation (HROS, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.05–1.40), Karnofsky performance scale score <70 (HROS, 3.58; 95% CI, 1.73–7.39; HRPFS, 4.48; 95% CI, 1.39–14.4), magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement (HROS, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.12–1.96; HRPFS, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.18–2.55), symmetric bilateral CNS invasion (HROS, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.03–1.96), and high proliferation index (Ki-67 >5%; HROS, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.11–4.86) were independent predictors of poor outcomes. In contrast, seizure occurrence (HROS, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.60–1.00; HRPFS, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.47–0.95), isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutation (HROS, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.05–0.49), and O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase promoter methylation (HROS, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.09–0.59) were associated with prolonged survival. Chemotherapy and surgical resection were associated with improved outcomes, but radiotherapy, whether monotherapy or combined with chemotherapy, was not superior to chemotherapy alone. Conclusions: In the largest study to date on GC, we have identified clinical, imaging, and molecular outcome predictors that are similar to other gliomas and highlight the beneficial effect of chemotherapy and surgical resection, when feasible, on outcomes.

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