Programming social support for smoking modification

An extention and replication

Russell E. Glasgow, Robert Klesges, H. Katherine O'Neill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In an extension and replication of previous work on social support in worksite smoking programs, 29 employees were assigned to either a basic smoking control program or to a basic treatment plus significant other support condition. Within a multiple baseline across behaviors design, all subjects received a 6 week treatment program that focused on achieving sequential reductions in nicotine content of brand smoked, number of cigarettes smoked per day, and percent of the cigarette smoked. Both treatment conditions were equally successful in producing abstinence (verified by biochemical analyses) and in producing reductions in smoking behavior among nonabstinent subjects at both posttest and 6-month follow-up assessments. In contrast to previous research with this program, there was considerable relapse in both conditions by follow-up. Consistent with previous findings, supportive social interactions were not related to treatment outcome, but the level of negative (nonsupportive) social interactions was inversely correlated with treatment success. Implications of these findings and directions for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)453-457
Number of pages5
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986

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Tobacco Products
Social Support
Smoking
Interpersonal Relations
Nicotine
Personnel
Workplace
Recurrence
Research
Direction compound

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Programming social support for smoking modification : An extention and replication. / Glasgow, Russell E.; Klesges, Robert; O'Neill, H. Katherine.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 11, No. 4, 01.01.1986, p. 453-457.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Glasgow, Russell E. ; Klesges, Robert ; O'Neill, H. Katherine. / Programming social support for smoking modification : An extention and replication. In: Addictive Behaviors. 1986 ; Vol. 11, No. 4. pp. 453-457.
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