Prolonged attenuation of cold-induced hypertension by adenoviral delivery of renin antisense

Xiuqing Wang, Zhongjie Sun, Robert Cade

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Renin has been linked to the pathogenesis of some forms of hypertension, including cold-induced hypertension (CIH). Although several antihypertensive drugs that inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 (AT1) receptors are available, they are short-lasting and have side effects. Inhibition of renin [the first and rate-limiting step of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS)] would provide an inhibition of the entire RAS. Thus, we developed an antisense approach for specific inhibition of renin based on the genetic design. The objective of this study was to test our hypothesis that adenoviral delivery of renin antisense inhibits renin and attenuates CIH. Methods. Recombinant adenoviruses carrying rat renin antisense (rAdv.RRA) and LacZ reporter gene (rAdv.LacZ) were constructed and used for in vivo gene transfer via intravenous injection. Four groups of rats were used (six rats/group). Blood pressure did not differ among the four groups during the control period at room temperature (25°C). Two groups of rats received rAdv.RRA (2.5 × 109 pfu/rat, intravenously), while the other two groups received the same dose of rAdv.LacZ and served as controls. After gene delivery, one rAdv.LacZ-treated and one rAdv.RRA-treated group were exposed to cold (5°C), while the remaining groups were kept at 25°C. Blood pressure was monitored weekly during cold exposure. A 24-hour urine sample was collected during weeks 1, 3, and 5 for measuring urinary aldosterone excretion. At the end of week 5, all animals were killed and blood was collected for measurement of plasma renin activity (PRA), total plasma renin, plasma active renin, and plasma aldosterone. Vascular Ang II contents were measured in all rats. Results. Blood pressure of the rAdv.LacZ-treated group rose significantly within 2 weeks of exposure to cold and reached 158.2 ± 6.4 mm Hg by week 5. In contrast, blood pressure (117.1 ± 5.3 mm Hg) of the cold-exposed group treated with rAdv.RRA did not increase until 5 weeks after exposure to cold. Thus, a single dose of rAdv.RRA prevented CIH for at least 5 weeks. rAdv.RRA abolished the cold-induced increases in PRA, total plasma renin, plasma active renin, vascular Ang II, and plasma and urine aldosterone, indicating effective inhibition of the entire RAS. Conclusion. rAdv.RRA effectively inhibited the entire RAS and produced prolonged attenuation of CIH. Antisense inhibition of renin may be a novel and ideal approach for long-term control of hypertension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)680-687
Number of pages8
JournalKidney International
Volume68
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Renin
Hypertension
Renin-Angiotensin System
Aldosterone
Blood Pressure
Angiotensin II
Blood Vessels
Urine
Angiotensin Type 1 Receptor
Lac Operon
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A
Reporter Genes
Adenoviridae
Intravenous Injections
Antihypertensive Agents
Genes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Prolonged attenuation of cold-induced hypertension by adenoviral delivery of renin antisense. / Wang, Xiuqing; Sun, Zhongjie; Cade, Robert.

In: Kidney International, Vol. 68, No. 2, 01.08.2005, p. 680-687.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background. Renin has been linked to the pathogenesis of some forms of hypertension, including cold-induced hypertension (CIH). Although several antihypertensive drugs that inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 (AT1) receptors are available, they are short-lasting and have side effects. Inhibition of renin [the first and rate-limiting step of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS)] would provide an inhibition of the entire RAS. Thus, we developed an antisense approach for specific inhibition of renin based on the genetic design. The objective of this study was to test our hypothesis that adenoviral delivery of renin antisense inhibits renin and attenuates CIH. Methods. Recombinant adenoviruses carrying rat renin antisense (rAdv.RRA) and LacZ reporter gene (rAdv.LacZ) were constructed and used for in vivo gene transfer via intravenous injection. Four groups of rats were used (six rats/group). Blood pressure did not differ among the four groups during the control period at room temperature (25°C). Two groups of rats received rAdv.RRA (2.5 × 109 pfu/rat, intravenously), while the other two groups received the same dose of rAdv.LacZ and served as controls. After gene delivery, one rAdv.LacZ-treated and one rAdv.RRA-treated group were exposed to cold (5°C), while the remaining groups were kept at 25°C. Blood pressure was monitored weekly during cold exposure. A 24-hour urine sample was collected during weeks 1, 3, and 5 for measuring urinary aldosterone excretion. At the end of week 5, all animals were killed and blood was collected for measurement of plasma renin activity (PRA), total plasma renin, plasma active renin, and plasma aldosterone. Vascular Ang II contents were measured in all rats. Results. Blood pressure of the rAdv.LacZ-treated group rose significantly within 2 weeks of exposure to cold and reached 158.2 ± 6.4 mm Hg by week 5. In contrast, blood pressure (117.1 ± 5.3 mm Hg) of the cold-exposed group treated with rAdv.RRA did not increase until 5 weeks after exposure to cold. Thus, a single dose of rAdv.RRA prevented CIH for at least 5 weeks. rAdv.RRA abolished the cold-induced increases in PRA, total plasma renin, plasma active renin, vascular Ang II, and plasma and urine aldosterone, indicating effective inhibition of the entire RAS. Conclusion. rAdv.RRA effectively inhibited the entire RAS and produced prolonged attenuation of CIH. Antisense inhibition of renin may be a novel and ideal approach for long-term control of hypertension.",
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N2 - Background. Renin has been linked to the pathogenesis of some forms of hypertension, including cold-induced hypertension (CIH). Although several antihypertensive drugs that inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 (AT1) receptors are available, they are short-lasting and have side effects. Inhibition of renin [the first and rate-limiting step of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS)] would provide an inhibition of the entire RAS. Thus, we developed an antisense approach for specific inhibition of renin based on the genetic design. The objective of this study was to test our hypothesis that adenoviral delivery of renin antisense inhibits renin and attenuates CIH. Methods. Recombinant adenoviruses carrying rat renin antisense (rAdv.RRA) and LacZ reporter gene (rAdv.LacZ) were constructed and used for in vivo gene transfer via intravenous injection. Four groups of rats were used (six rats/group). Blood pressure did not differ among the four groups during the control period at room temperature (25°C). Two groups of rats received rAdv.RRA (2.5 × 109 pfu/rat, intravenously), while the other two groups received the same dose of rAdv.LacZ and served as controls. After gene delivery, one rAdv.LacZ-treated and one rAdv.RRA-treated group were exposed to cold (5°C), while the remaining groups were kept at 25°C. Blood pressure was monitored weekly during cold exposure. A 24-hour urine sample was collected during weeks 1, 3, and 5 for measuring urinary aldosterone excretion. At the end of week 5, all animals were killed and blood was collected for measurement of plasma renin activity (PRA), total plasma renin, plasma active renin, and plasma aldosterone. Vascular Ang II contents were measured in all rats. Results. Blood pressure of the rAdv.LacZ-treated group rose significantly within 2 weeks of exposure to cold and reached 158.2 ± 6.4 mm Hg by week 5. In contrast, blood pressure (117.1 ± 5.3 mm Hg) of the cold-exposed group treated with rAdv.RRA did not increase until 5 weeks after exposure to cold. Thus, a single dose of rAdv.RRA prevented CIH for at least 5 weeks. rAdv.RRA abolished the cold-induced increases in PRA, total plasma renin, plasma active renin, vascular Ang II, and plasma and urine aldosterone, indicating effective inhibition of the entire RAS. Conclusion. rAdv.RRA effectively inhibited the entire RAS and produced prolonged attenuation of CIH. Antisense inhibition of renin may be a novel and ideal approach for long-term control of hypertension.

AB - Background. Renin has been linked to the pathogenesis of some forms of hypertension, including cold-induced hypertension (CIH). Although several antihypertensive drugs that inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 (AT1) receptors are available, they are short-lasting and have side effects. Inhibition of renin [the first and rate-limiting step of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS)] would provide an inhibition of the entire RAS. Thus, we developed an antisense approach for specific inhibition of renin based on the genetic design. The objective of this study was to test our hypothesis that adenoviral delivery of renin antisense inhibits renin and attenuates CIH. Methods. Recombinant adenoviruses carrying rat renin antisense (rAdv.RRA) and LacZ reporter gene (rAdv.LacZ) were constructed and used for in vivo gene transfer via intravenous injection. Four groups of rats were used (six rats/group). Blood pressure did not differ among the four groups during the control period at room temperature (25°C). Two groups of rats received rAdv.RRA (2.5 × 109 pfu/rat, intravenously), while the other two groups received the same dose of rAdv.LacZ and served as controls. After gene delivery, one rAdv.LacZ-treated and one rAdv.RRA-treated group were exposed to cold (5°C), while the remaining groups were kept at 25°C. Blood pressure was monitored weekly during cold exposure. A 24-hour urine sample was collected during weeks 1, 3, and 5 for measuring urinary aldosterone excretion. At the end of week 5, all animals were killed and blood was collected for measurement of plasma renin activity (PRA), total plasma renin, plasma active renin, and plasma aldosterone. Vascular Ang II contents were measured in all rats. Results. Blood pressure of the rAdv.LacZ-treated group rose significantly within 2 weeks of exposure to cold and reached 158.2 ± 6.4 mm Hg by week 5. In contrast, blood pressure (117.1 ± 5.3 mm Hg) of the cold-exposed group treated with rAdv.RRA did not increase until 5 weeks after exposure to cold. Thus, a single dose of rAdv.RRA prevented CIH for at least 5 weeks. rAdv.RRA abolished the cold-induced increases in PRA, total plasma renin, plasma active renin, vascular Ang II, and plasma and urine aldosterone, indicating effective inhibition of the entire RAS. Conclusion. rAdv.RRA effectively inhibited the entire RAS and produced prolonged attenuation of CIH. Antisense inhibition of renin may be a novel and ideal approach for long-term control of hypertension.

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