Prolonged high-fat-diet feeding promotes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and alters gut microbiota in mice

Kandy T. Velázquez, Reilly T. Enos, Jackie E. Bader, Alexander T. Sougiannis, Meredith S. Carson, Ioulia Chatzistamou, James Carson, Prakash S. Nagarkatti, Mitzi Nagarkatti, E. Angela Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become an epidemic largely due to the worldwide increase in obesity. While lifestyle modifications and pharmacotherapies have been used to alleviate NAFLD, successful treatment options are limited. One of the main barriers to finding safe and effective drugs for long-term use in NAFLD is the fast initiation and progression of disease in the available preclinical models. Therefore, we are in need of preclinical models that (1) mimic the human manifestation of NAFLD and (2) have a longer progression time to allow for the design of superior treatments. Aim To characterize a model of prolonged high-fat diet (HFD) feeding for investigation of the long-term progression of NAFLD. Methods In this study, we utilized prolonged HFD feeding to examine NAFLD features in C57BL/6 male mice. We fed mice with a HFD (60% fat, 20% protein, and 20% carbohydrate) for 80 wk to promote obesity (Old-HFD group, n = 18). A low-fat diet (LFD) (14% fat, 32% protein, and 54% carbohydrate) was administered for the same duration to age-matched mice (Old-LFD group, n = 15). An additional group of mice was maintained on the LFD (Young-LFD, n = 20) for a shorter duration (6 wk) to distinguish between age-dependent and age-independent effects. Liver, colon, adipose tissue, and feces were collected for histological and molecular assessments. Results Prolonged HFD feeding led to obesity and insulin resistance. Histological analysis in the liver of HFD mice demonstrated steatosis, cell injury, portal and lobular inflammation and fibrosis. In addition, molecular analysis for markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress established that the liver tissue of HFD mice have increased phosphorylated Jnk and CHOP. Lastly, we evaluated the gut microbial composition of Old-LFD and Old-HFD. We observed that prolonged HFD feeding in mice increased the relative abundance of the Firmicutes phylum. At the genus level, we observed a significant increase in the abundance of Adercreutzia, Coprococcus, Dorea, and Ruminococcus and decreased relative abundance of Turicibacter and Anaeroplasma in HFD mice. Conclusion Overall, these data suggest that chronic HFD consumption in mice can mimic pathophysiological and some microbial events observed in NAFLD patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)619-637
Number of pages19
JournalWorld Journal of Hepatology
Volume11
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress
High Fat Diet
Fibrosis
Obesity
Inflammation
Fat-Restricted Diet
Liver
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Ruminococcus
Fats
Carbohydrates
Feces
Disease Progression
Insulin Resistance
Adipose Tissue
Life Style
Colon
Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hepatology

Cite this

Velázquez, K. T., Enos, R. T., Bader, J. E., Sougiannis, A. T., Carson, M. S., Chatzistamou, I., ... Murphy, E. A. (2019). Prolonged high-fat-diet feeding promotes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and alters gut microbiota in mice. World Journal of Hepatology, 11(8), 619-637. https://doi.org/10.4254/wjh.v11.i8.619

Prolonged high-fat-diet feeding promotes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and alters gut microbiota in mice. / Velázquez, Kandy T.; Enos, Reilly T.; Bader, Jackie E.; Sougiannis, Alexander T.; Carson, Meredith S.; Chatzistamou, Ioulia; Carson, James; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Murphy, E. Angela.

In: World Journal of Hepatology, Vol. 11, No. 8, 01.01.2019, p. 619-637.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Velázquez, KT, Enos, RT, Bader, JE, Sougiannis, AT, Carson, MS, Chatzistamou, I, Carson, J, Nagarkatti, PS, Nagarkatti, M & Murphy, EA 2019, 'Prolonged high-fat-diet feeding promotes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and alters gut microbiota in mice', World Journal of Hepatology, vol. 11, no. 8, pp. 619-637. https://doi.org/10.4254/wjh.v11.i8.619
Velázquez, Kandy T. ; Enos, Reilly T. ; Bader, Jackie E. ; Sougiannis, Alexander T. ; Carson, Meredith S. ; Chatzistamou, Ioulia ; Carson, James ; Nagarkatti, Prakash S. ; Nagarkatti, Mitzi ; Murphy, E. Angela. / Prolonged high-fat-diet feeding promotes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and alters gut microbiota in mice. In: World Journal of Hepatology. 2019 ; Vol. 11, No. 8. pp. 619-637.
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AU - Sougiannis, Alexander T.

AU - Carson, Meredith S.

AU - Chatzistamou, Ioulia

AU - Carson, James

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AU - Murphy, E. Angela

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N2 - Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become an epidemic largely due to the worldwide increase in obesity. While lifestyle modifications and pharmacotherapies have been used to alleviate NAFLD, successful treatment options are limited. One of the main barriers to finding safe and effective drugs for long-term use in NAFLD is the fast initiation and progression of disease in the available preclinical models. Therefore, we are in need of preclinical models that (1) mimic the human manifestation of NAFLD and (2) have a longer progression time to allow for the design of superior treatments. Aim To characterize a model of prolonged high-fat diet (HFD) feeding for investigation of the long-term progression of NAFLD. Methods In this study, we utilized prolonged HFD feeding to examine NAFLD features in C57BL/6 male mice. We fed mice with a HFD (60% fat, 20% protein, and 20% carbohydrate) for 80 wk to promote obesity (Old-HFD group, n = 18). A low-fat diet (LFD) (14% fat, 32% protein, and 54% carbohydrate) was administered for the same duration to age-matched mice (Old-LFD group, n = 15). An additional group of mice was maintained on the LFD (Young-LFD, n = 20) for a shorter duration (6 wk) to distinguish between age-dependent and age-independent effects. Liver, colon, adipose tissue, and feces were collected for histological and molecular assessments. Results Prolonged HFD feeding led to obesity and insulin resistance. Histological analysis in the liver of HFD mice demonstrated steatosis, cell injury, portal and lobular inflammation and fibrosis. In addition, molecular analysis for markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress established that the liver tissue of HFD mice have increased phosphorylated Jnk and CHOP. Lastly, we evaluated the gut microbial composition of Old-LFD and Old-HFD. We observed that prolonged HFD feeding in mice increased the relative abundance of the Firmicutes phylum. At the genus level, we observed a significant increase in the abundance of Adercreutzia, Coprococcus, Dorea, and Ruminococcus and decreased relative abundance of Turicibacter and Anaeroplasma in HFD mice. Conclusion Overall, these data suggest that chronic HFD consumption in mice can mimic pathophysiological and some microbial events observed in NAFLD patients.

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