Propensity for social interaction predicts nicotine-reinforced behaviors in outbred rats

T. Wang, W. Han, B. Wang, Q. Jiang, L. C. Solberg-Woods, A. A. Palmer, Hao Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Social and genetic factors can influence smoking behavior. Using olfactogustatory stimuli as the sensory cue for intravenous nicotine self-administration (SA), we previously showed that social learning of nicotine contingent odor cue prevented rats from developing conditioned taste aversion and allowed them to instead establish stable nicotine SA. We hypothesized that genetic factors influenced socially acquired nicotine SA. A heterogeneous stock (HS; N/NIH) of outbred rats was trained to self-administer nicotine using the social learning protocol. Both male and female HS rats acquired nicotine SA, but females self-administered more nicotine than males. After extinction, the context previously paired with nicotine SA, in conjunction with socially transmitted drug cues, was sufficient to cause reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. Wide variation in both nicotine intake and reinstatement was observed. Using multiple regression analysis, we found that measures of social interaction were significant predictors of nicotine intake and reinstatement of drug seeking in both males and females. Furthermore, measures of depression were predictors of nicotine intake in both males and females, anxiety was a predictor only in males and response to novelty was a predictor only in females. In males, measures of both depression and anxiety predicted nicotine reinstatement. Together, these data supported the ideas that genetically determined propensities for emotional and social phenotypes are significant determinants for nicotine-reinforced behavior, and that the HS rat is a suitable tool for dissecting genetic mechanisms that may underlie the interaction between social behavior, anxiety, depression and smoking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)202-212
Number of pages11
JournalGenes, Brain and Behavior
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2014

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Interpersonal Relations
Nicotine
Self Administration
Cues
Anxiety
Depression
Smoking
Drug-Seeking Behavior
Social Behavior
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Regression Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics
  • Neurology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Propensity for social interaction predicts nicotine-reinforced behaviors in outbred rats. / Wang, T.; Han, W.; Wang, B.; Jiang, Q.; Solberg-Woods, L. C.; Palmer, A. A.; Chen, Hao.

In: Genes, Brain and Behavior, Vol. 13, No. 2, 01.02.2014, p. 202-212.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, T, Han, W, Wang, B, Jiang, Q, Solberg-Woods, LC, Palmer, AA & Chen, H 2014, 'Propensity for social interaction predicts nicotine-reinforced behaviors in outbred rats', Genes, Brain and Behavior, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 202-212. https://doi.org/10.1111/gbb.12112
Wang, T. ; Han, W. ; Wang, B. ; Jiang, Q. ; Solberg-Woods, L. C. ; Palmer, A. A. ; Chen, Hao. / Propensity for social interaction predicts nicotine-reinforced behaviors in outbred rats. In: Genes, Brain and Behavior. 2014 ; Vol. 13, No. 2. pp. 202-212.
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