Prophylactic antibiotics for elective colorectal surgery or operation for obstruction of the small bowel

a comparison of cefonicid and cefoxitin.

T. C. Fabian, E. C. Mangiante, S. J. Boldreghini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Elective colorectal surgery carries a rate of septic complications of up to 35% in patients not receiving prophylaxis. This can be reduced to 5% in patients receiving appropriate prophylactic agents. The safety and efficacy of cefonicid, a new cephalosporin with a half-life of 4-5 hr, were compared with those of cefoxitin for prophylaxis in patients undergoing elective colorectal procedures or surgery for obstruction of the small bowel. Fifty-seven assessable patients were randomly assigned in a double-blind fashion to therapy with 1 g of cefonicid intravenously (iv) or intramuscularly (im) 1 hr before surgery only or 2 g of cefoxitin iv or im 1 hr before surgery and 2 g every 6 hr for 24 hr. Groups were comparable in terms of underlying diseases. Samples for blood culture were obtained immediately before and after surgery and at 8:00 A.M. on the first and second postoperative days. No blood cultures were positive. Two of 30 patients receiving cefonicid developed wound infections (6%). Two of 27 patients receiving cefoxitin developed wound infections, and one developed an intraabdominal abscess (11%). No significant adverse effects were noted. The results suggest cefonicid may be an effective prophylactic antibiotic for bowel surgery. Most importantly, cefonicid offers the advantages associated with the administration of a single daily dosage, among which are reduction of pharmacy costs and the freeing of nursing hours for patient care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalReviews of Infectious Diseases
Volume6 Suppl 4
StatePublished - Nov 1984
Externally publishedYes

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Cefonicid
Cefoxitin
Colorectal Surgery
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Wound Infection
Cephalosporins
Abscess
Half-Life
Patient Care
Nursing
Safety
Costs and Cost Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Prophylactic antibiotics for elective colorectal surgery or operation for obstruction of the small bowel : a comparison of cefonicid and cefoxitin. / Fabian, T. C.; Mangiante, E. C.; Boldreghini, S. J.

In: Reviews of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 6 Suppl 4, 11.1984.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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