Proportion and extent of manifestation of molar-incisor-hypomineralizations according to different phenotypes

Jan Kühnisch, Daniela Heitmüller, Elisabeth Thiering, Inken Brockow, Ute Hoffmann, Claudia Neumann, Roswitha Heinrich-Weltzien, Carl Peter Bauer, Andrea Von Berg, Sybille Koletzko, Franklin Garcia-Godoy, Reinhard Hickel, Joachim Heinrich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: This epidemiological study aimed to assess the proportion and extent of manifestation of enamel hypomineralization, including molar-incisor-hypomineralization (MIH), in the permanent and primary dentition. Methods: A total of 693 children enrolled in an ongoing birth cohort study (GINIplus-10) were examined at their 10-year follow-up. Enamel hypomineralization was scored in the primary and permanent dentition on a tooth- and surface-related level based on the criteria of the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD). Children were grouped according to their distribution pattern of enamel hypomineralization: children with a minimum of one hypomineralized tooth in the primary dentition (ht ≥ 1) and permanent dentition (HT ≥ 1); with a minimum of one hypomineralization on at least one first permanent molar (MIH); and with hypomineralization on at least one first permanent molar and permanent incisor (M + IH). For each group, the mean values of hypomineralized primary teeth (ht), permanent teeth (HT), and permanent surfaces (HS) were calculated. Results: The proportion of affected children was 36.5 percent (HT ≥ 1), 14.7 percent (MIH), and 9.4 percent (M + IH); 6.9 percent of the subjects had a minimum of one affected primary tooth (ht ≥ 1). The mean number of hypomineralized permanent teeth and surfaces were 2.3HT/2.9HS (HT ≥ 1), 3.4HT/4.8HS (MIH), and 4.2HT/5.9HS (M + IH). The mean number of hypomineralized primary teeth amounted to 0.1ht in the entire study population. Conclusions: Enamel hypomineralization can be detected frequently in this study sample. Children with M + IH showed the highest number of affected teeth and surfaces followed by those with MIH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)42-49
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Public Health Dentistry
Volume74
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

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Dental Enamel Hypoplasia
Deciduous Tooth
Phenotype
Dental Enamel
Tooth
Permanent Dentition
Pediatric Dentistry
Incisor
Epidemiologic Studies
Cohort Studies
Parturition

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Kühnisch, J., Heitmüller, D., Thiering, E., Brockow, I., Hoffmann, U., Neumann, C., ... Heinrich, J. (2014). Proportion and extent of manifestation of molar-incisor-hypomineralizations according to different phenotypes. Journal of Public Health Dentistry, 74(1), 42-49. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1752-7325.2012.00365.x

Proportion and extent of manifestation of molar-incisor-hypomineralizations according to different phenotypes. / Kühnisch, Jan; Heitmüller, Daniela; Thiering, Elisabeth; Brockow, Inken; Hoffmann, Ute; Neumann, Claudia; Heinrich-Weltzien, Roswitha; Bauer, Carl Peter; Von Berg, Andrea; Koletzko, Sybille; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Hickel, Reinhard; Heinrich, Joachim.

In: Journal of Public Health Dentistry, Vol. 74, No. 1, 01.12.2014, p. 42-49.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kühnisch, J, Heitmüller, D, Thiering, E, Brockow, I, Hoffmann, U, Neumann, C, Heinrich-Weltzien, R, Bauer, CP, Von Berg, A, Koletzko, S, Garcia-Godoy, F, Hickel, R & Heinrich, J 2014, 'Proportion and extent of manifestation of molar-incisor-hypomineralizations according to different phenotypes', Journal of Public Health Dentistry, vol. 74, no. 1, pp. 42-49. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1752-7325.2012.00365.x
Kühnisch, Jan ; Heitmüller, Daniela ; Thiering, Elisabeth ; Brockow, Inken ; Hoffmann, Ute ; Neumann, Claudia ; Heinrich-Weltzien, Roswitha ; Bauer, Carl Peter ; Von Berg, Andrea ; Koletzko, Sybille ; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin ; Hickel, Reinhard ; Heinrich, Joachim. / Proportion and extent of manifestation of molar-incisor-hypomineralizations according to different phenotypes. In: Journal of Public Health Dentistry. 2014 ; Vol. 74, No. 1. pp. 42-49.
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AU - Kühnisch, Jan

AU - Heitmüller, Daniela

AU - Thiering, Elisabeth

AU - Brockow, Inken

AU - Hoffmann, Ute

AU - Neumann, Claudia

AU - Heinrich-Weltzien, Roswitha

AU - Bauer, Carl Peter

AU - Von Berg, Andrea

AU - Koletzko, Sybille

AU - Garcia-Godoy, Franklin

AU - Hickel, Reinhard

AU - Heinrich, Joachim

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N2 - Objective: This epidemiological study aimed to assess the proportion and extent of manifestation of enamel hypomineralization, including molar-incisor-hypomineralization (MIH), in the permanent and primary dentition. Methods: A total of 693 children enrolled in an ongoing birth cohort study (GINIplus-10) were examined at their 10-year follow-up. Enamel hypomineralization was scored in the primary and permanent dentition on a tooth- and surface-related level based on the criteria of the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD). Children were grouped according to their distribution pattern of enamel hypomineralization: children with a minimum of one hypomineralized tooth in the primary dentition (ht ≥ 1) and permanent dentition (HT ≥ 1); with a minimum of one hypomineralization on at least one first permanent molar (MIH); and with hypomineralization on at least one first permanent molar and permanent incisor (M + IH). For each group, the mean values of hypomineralized primary teeth (ht), permanent teeth (HT), and permanent surfaces (HS) were calculated. Results: The proportion of affected children was 36.5 percent (HT ≥ 1), 14.7 percent (MIH), and 9.4 percent (M + IH); 6.9 percent of the subjects had a minimum of one affected primary tooth (ht ≥ 1). The mean number of hypomineralized permanent teeth and surfaces were 2.3HT/2.9HS (HT ≥ 1), 3.4HT/4.8HS (MIH), and 4.2HT/5.9HS (M + IH). The mean number of hypomineralized primary teeth amounted to 0.1ht in the entire study population. Conclusions: Enamel hypomineralization can be detected frequently in this study sample. Children with M + IH showed the highest number of affected teeth and surfaces followed by those with MIH.

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